Top article of the week – 9 Cool

Hello there and welcome to our weekly feature titled top article of the
week.
Especially chosen for you, these articles will help you to keep up to date
with current trends plus a lot more.
Enjoy!

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9 Cool Things You Didn’t Know You Could Do with Siri
Posted by Sandy Stachowiak on Aug 02, 2017 |

9 Cool Things You Didn’t Know You Could Do with Siri


Some people use Siri every day to take care of tasks like opening apps,
setting up meetings, or creating reminders. But, there are many others who
completely forget that Siri exists. If you are in the latter group, you may
not realize just how much Siri can help. Aside from ordinary tasks, take a
look at what else Siri can do for you on your iOS device or Mac
#1. Phone – Access Calls
When you need to make a call in a hurry, there is no reason to hunt down a
contact’s number. And, Siri can get you other details as well. Try these
commands without even opening your Phone app:
Call (contact) on their home phone.
Get my call history.
Play the voicemail from (contact).
Do I have new voicemails?
Phone Siri Commands
#2. Restaurants – Get Details
You may have a preferred app for finding restaurants or making reservations.
But, Siri can do this for you too. The next time you want to make plans for
dinner, you can use these Siri commands:
Find the best burger place in (city).
Show me reviews for (restaurant and city).
Make a reservation at (restaurant name or type) (day and time).
Where is the closest pizza place?
Restaurants Siri Commands
#3. Movies and TV – Search for Shows and Theaters
Whether you want to find the latest episode of your favorite show or see
which movies are playing at your local theater, you are covered with Siri.
Check out these examples of how Siri can help you find what to watch:
Watch the latest episode of (TV show).
Find horror movies on Netflix.
What is (movie) rated?
Show me what movies are playing nearby.
Movies and TV Siri Commands
#4. Settings – Access Settings
Save time from opening your Settings app to perform simple actions. Siri can
do exactly what you need, when you need it. Here are just a few things you
can ask:
Is my Bluetooth on?
Turn on Airplane Mode.
Open Sounds.
Show me my Facebook settings.
Settings Siri Commands
#5. Home – For Home App Users
If you use the Home app to secure your home or automate settings, Siri can
speed things up when you are heading out the door. Give commands or ask
questions like these:
Lock the back door.
Is the porch light on?
Set up for movie night.
Is the front door locked?
Home Siri Commands
On Your Mac
#6. Finder – Open Files
This may be one of the commands you already use to open folders quickly.
But, what many people might not know is that Siri can open files based on a
day, name, or contact. Just start the command with the words Find, Open,
Get, or Show. Here are a few examples:
Find the Word doc I worked on yesterday.
Open the file (filename).
Get the file (contact) sent me.
Show me all Excel files.
Finder Siri Commands
#7. System Preferences – Make Adjustments
You can view and adjust system settings, change your display settings, and
even ask a settings-related question. For instance:
Make my screen brighter (or darker).
Change my wallpaper.
Is my Wi-Fi on?
Put my Mac to sleep.
System Preferences Siri Commands
#8. About This Mac – Get Information Fast
While you can certainly click the Apple logo from your menu and select About
This Mac, you don’t have to if you just ask Siri. Try some of these handy
commands for quick details about your machine:
How much storage space do I have?
How fast is my Mac?
What is my serial number?
What OS version do I have?
About My Mac Siri Commands
#9. On All of Your Devices
General Questions: Get answers to math problems, city details, word
spellings, and more.
Maps: Ask for directions, show locations on the map, or find local
businesses.
Messages: Send or respond to messages, read alerts, search for messages.
Music: Play a specific artist or song from Apple Music, identify tunes, or
buy songs.
Sports: Get scores, game schedules, and standings.
If you are ever unsure of what you can ask Siri, just open the app and click
the Question Mark icon. Each category will display on your device and you
can select one for more details.
Siri Commands
You can also have a little fun with Siri by asking questions like, “What’s
your last name?”, “What’s your favorite color?”, or “Do you like
Microsoft?”. Or, ask to hear a joke, story, or poem. Whatever you choose
to use Siri for, remember to take advantage of this handy built-in tool.

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How to make fitness classes more accessible

Hello everyone:
Each month I will be responding to a question; chosen from a pool of some of
the most commonly asked ones that I have been asked over the years and
continue to be asked.
This month, I’d like to answer the following question:
How to make fitness classes more accessible.

The trick here is to ensure that your staff is well trained when it comes to
interacting with clients with special needs and that your equipment is easy
to access. These are the two primary objectives that you should keep in
mind if you are thinking of offering your fitness classes to persons with
disabilities.

Here are some points to remember.
1. Make sure that your staff is well trained when it comes to being able to
interact physically with clients.

2. That they are able to provide appropriate guiding techniques.

3. That they are able to answer the more important questions and that they
are not afraid to ask questions of their own. That is, that they are not
afraid to ask clients to tell them what they require of them as staff
members.

4. That you provide enough staff members to be of assistance to clients.
Quite often, you may be required to provide one on one assistance.

5. That the equipment is laid out in such a manner that it is easy for
clients to access them without too much difficulty.

This should be enough to get you started.

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Top article of the week – Self-Advocacy in the Healthcare System

Hello there and welcome to our weekly feature titled top article of the
week.
Especially chosen for you, these articles will help you to keep up to date
with current trends plus a lot more.
Enjoy!

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Self-Advocacy in the Healthcare System
Blindness and Medical Facilities, Take Two: More About Advocating for
Yourself in a Medical Situation
Deborah Kendrick
In the March issue of AccessWorld,
http://www.afb.org/afbpress/pubnew.asp?DocID=aw180302

I wrote about an unplanned hospital stay and the lessons I gleaned from
that experience. Two surprises ensued: first, I wound up returning for an
even longer hospital-and-rehabilitation tour of duty and, second, I found
out that many readers wanted to talk about navigating medical situations as
people with visual impairments or blindness. Here, then, is what we might
consider the second part of the medical adventure, in which I’ll share some
of my own experience along with what readers and others have to say. The
outcome, we hope, will be some useful preparation for all of us for the
next stressful medical encounter.
My Repeat Performance
My initial hospital and rehab adventure began with the sudden snapping of my
left femur. The bone had been weakened several years earlier by radiation
and aggravated eight months earlier by hip replacement surgery. A
prosthetic hip is like a ball on a stem. The stem is inserted into the
femur, the longest bone in the body. The procedure is akin to threading a
peg into a pipe, and my “pipe” was fragile and broke unexpectedly. The
repair that was done involved an eight-inch metal plate and several wires.
After eight weeks of mobility in a wheelchair, an x-ray determined that the
bone was broken yet again, the metal plate was at a very unhealthy angle,
and all wires were broken.
The original incident with follow-up hospital stay was in Ohio. The failure
was discovered in Florida. Consequently, finding a surgeon in Florida to do
the reconstruction was the best plan. I did find a surgeon who specializes
in hip and leg reconstructions, and he took my case. Some might find the
medical details gruesome and some might find them fascinating. If you are
the first sort, skip the next paragraph!
Since the femur had broken at exactly the point where it needed to connect
to the prosthesis, repairing it at that juncture (as the first surgeon had
done) wasn’t the best plan. The new surgeon’s approach was to tear out the
now ten-month-old prosthesis (no easy feat) and replace it with one that
had an extended “stem.” The typical hip replacement stem, when inserted into
the femur, ends near the top of the thigh. My new one ends at mid-thigh. In
addition, a cadaver bone was placed over the section of femur most damaged
by radiation and fractures (about 2.5 inches). And finally, the entire bone
was wrapped in heavy cable to hold it in place.
This second surgery meant spending one week in hospital followed by several
in a short-term rehabilitation facility. In Ohio, I had a network of
friends who visited every day and kept my spirits high and my focus off
medical issues. This time, however, I was in a state where I knew virtually
no one and thus had few diversions and no one to help me navigate the
unfamiliar human or mechanical terrain.
The night before my surgery, I found genuine solace in Googling the hospital
and surgeon. When I found the hospital on a “100 best” list compiled by a
major news organization and the surgeon identified as a respected teacher
and innovator in his field, my optimism regarding outcome soared!
In the operating room, I made sure everyone knew I wore hearing aids and
secured approval to keep them in. I explained that, because I am completely
blind, I obtain much vital information by hearing. Without the hearing
aids, that would not be possible.
My first day after surgery was spent in the intensive care unit. Once I was
aware of my surroundings, I realized that my space wasn’t separated from
the rest of the unit at all. The only thing between me and staff, visitors,
and other patients was a curtain. Consequently, it was impossible for me to
distinguish whether people were talking to me or to someone else. It sounds
silly, but when you are already vulnerable and unable to move, this kind of
thing adds yet another layer of stress and vulnerability.
The one piece of technology I had with me even in ICU was my iPhone. I’m not
sure whether I made many calls or sent messages during that phase, but I
clearly remember the sense of connection it gave me to have a working phone
in my hand.
Once I was returned to the orthopedic floor, I connected my laptop as well.
Because the greatest problems connected with blindness are, as much in a
medical facility as anywhere else, mostly related to myth and
misunderstanding, I came to appreciate my technology in its ability to
function as a bridge to understanding. A nurse or aide or physical therapist
who might at first see a blind person as strange will generally relax a bit
upon seeing a tablet or smart phone or other device that is so familiar.
Being a bit geeky, in other words, was an advantage in this environment.
Of course, my access technology had plenty of practical uses as well. In
addition to continuing to do my job after the first few days, my technology
solved a variety of small problems.
In the short-term rehab facility, I continued to find random pages of print
on the foot of my bed, the chair, the table. Usually, the KNFB Reader app
identified these for me as a calendar or note about my recovery plan. When
no one responded to my call light (which happened frequently), I took to
wheeling myself to the doorway of my room and scanning the hall with
TapTapSee to see if there were any staff nearby.
What Others Have to Say
We heard from AccessWorld readers who wanted to use the article to post in
medical employee areas or as a handout in college classes. Most
importantly, however, we heard from readers who had experienced the
“blindness meets medical situation” up close and personally, either for
their own health crisis or that of a loved one. The input was unanimous:
everyone wants more information on this topic and more of a road map for
navigating and advocating in these troubled waters.
One reader who wrote to us was Nancy Irwin, an access technology instructor
in South Carolina. Her husband, Billy Irwin, had gone to the emergency room
more than once and each time was perhaps more stressful than the one before
it. Both Nancy and Billy are blind.
Although they had gone together one of those times, the worst was when he
went alone in an ambulance. Upon arrival, Billy was seated in a wheelchair,
checked in, and pushed aside. Unclear about his surroundings or what might
happen next, he was neglected for three hours. When he vomited on the
floor, he says staff was angry with him.
Nancy caught up as soon as she could, and both reported that once he had
someone with him, the situation was somewhat diffused. The couple began
communicating with one another and others around them. Other patients, they
say, became involved in advocating for a guy who was just plain sick, like
everyone else waiting, and who needed additional information due to
blindness.
When Billy was admitted, trays of food were sometimes delivered without any
verbal information announcing the fact.
Both say that the more they interacted with nurses, the more manageable the
situation became, but it was never easy.
Ironically, Billy works as an emergency manager for amateur radio operators
in the area, disseminating emergency information to police, fire, and
medical responders, so he is no stranger to the emergency scene.
“The problem,” Billy says, “is that people just have no idea how to deal
with a blind person. They need training and they need exposure to real
blind people.”
The only marginally “accessible” piece of technology made available during
Billy’s hospital stay was the combination TV remote and call light. The
button marked with the braille “n” on the remote was the one that would
summon a nurse. Ironically, the remote was not otherwise accessible, but the
couple did contact a nurse who spent the time to familiarize them with it.
Lisa Salinger, an access technology trainer and administrative assistant for
BlindAlive, has been navigating another kind of medical facility
experience. When she realized one morning that her housemate and friend was
having a stroke, she called 911. After the hospital stay, her friend was
moved to a rehabilitation facility for therapy and Lisa was the family
member who came day after day to bring food, encouragement, and
companionship. Gradually, Lisa taught at least some nurses and nursing
aides how to interact with blind people.
Finding printed menus, calendars, or notes on her friend’s bed, Lisa took
pictures to read them with her iPhone app.
At times, when there was no one available to assist with a medical procedure
in time, Lisa motivated staff to respond by offering the alternate choice
that they teach her how to perform the task needed.
Similarly, when Billy Irwin grew tired of waiting for staff to disconnect
his IV pole every time he needed to use the bathroom, he found someone to
teach him how to disconnect it himself.
Like Lisa and Billy, others find workarounds to getting things done in a
medical facility and/or gradually gain the attention and respect of one or
two staff members who will provide needed information or hands-on
demonstration. Sometimes, though, the “soft” approach isn’t sufficient.
Tom Tobin, an Ohio fundraising professional and AccessWorld reader, recalls
a time when medical professionals had to be dismissed because there was
such a lack of respect. When he was having his insulin pump installed over
20 years ago, the attending physician showed such a lack of regard for the
patient’s ability to manage and understand his own diabetes that Tom fired
him and found another.
That Mind-Body Connection
Every stress-filled example readers have shared with me struck at least one
chord with my own experience. From not knowing food was in the room when
you are starving, to missing the printed information shouting at you from
all directions, to being a visitor and finding the elevator buttons do not
have braille on them–each minor frustration interferes with wellness.
Healing the body is assisted or hindered by the patient’s state of mind,
and when a patient feels discounted or ignored due to low vision or
blindness, the quality of their care is diminished.
So … what can we do to make interactions with medical facilities more
acceptable?
Advocate, Advocate, Advocate
One thing most of us as visually impaired people can do is talk! I was so
unprepared for what happened when first transferred from the Florida
hospital to the short-term rehab facility that I was temporarily
traumatized. I was delivered, via wheelchair, to a room and left. No
orientation or familiarization. No assurance of someone coming back in some
amount of time. I had no idea where my belongings were, where the call
light or the room phone were, or where I was! I wasn’t very strong yet nor
was I adept at propelling the wheelchair from place to place. Eventually, I
reminded myself that I could think, that I needed to be my own
cheerleader/advocate and, slowly, tentatively, began moving about the room
to explore. Suffice to say, the situation improved from there, but there
were many more moments of this variety. The longer I was there, the
stronger my conviction that I needed to depend on myself to get what I
needed. Usually, this was accomplished with a smile, but sometimes, the
gentlest among us need to get a bit tougher. Once I began exploring my
environment and getting outdoors (propelling a wheelchair without benefit
of white cane is a learning experience in its own right), my attitude
improved dramatically. My desire to get out of rehab probably expedited my
recovery!
A Little Help From Your Friends
There was a stark contrast between my hospital experience in Ohio, where I
had the support of friends, and the one in Florida, where I was pretty much
alone. If you know ahead of time that you are going to be in a hospital or
medical facility, try to line up support from family and friends in
advance. Even a casual friend or acquaintance will look out for your
individual needs more than relying exclusively on staff who have dozens of
other patients needing attention.
Use Your Technology
I kept my iPhone with me at all times and usually my laptop or braille
notetaker as well. This kind of technology can serve as tangible evidence
that you are more like than unlike the medical staff with whom you are
interacting. Asking about any technology in the room was beneficial, too. As
the Irwins pointed out, once they found someone willing to provide a
verbal/tactile tour of the remote, they were able to enjoy TV shows and
thus connect in another way with staff as well.
Explain Those Techniques
When I began using a walker in physical therapy, I asked when I could use it
on my own time, in order to build strength and practice. For several days,
my request was denied. Finally, I realized it was blindness related. The
therapist was afraid to allow me to practice walking without assistance for
fear I would crash into a wall or trip over a chair. Patiently, tediously, I
explained how I navigate a familiar environment. I had to demonstrate
repeatedly–“I touch the wall to confirm my location …” and “I touch the
door frame before turning to confirm that I am allowing sufficient space
for the walker and me …” and so on. I found myself explaining frequently
about muscle memory and echolocation, but the payoff was improved
interaction with medical professionals and decisions based on recovery
rather than misconceptions about blindness.
Use Your Power
You or your insurance company is paying for your care. If the care is
compromised by misunderstandings about your ability as a person who is
blind, change it. If your cellular service was inadequate, you would change
companies. If a medical situation becomes absolutely untenable, change it
as well.
Rx Round-up
Being in a medical facility where others control many of your simplest
activities is stressful for everyone. Adding blindness to the mix increases
confusion on both sides: the patient with the visual impairment needs
additional information and the medical professional often come to the
bedside with ill-conceived notions of a blind patient’s capabilities. There
is a profound need for training in these facilities. Perhaps some readers
will pick up this challenge and initiate trainings in their communities. In
the meantime, be your own advocate, take a friend or family member if
possible, and depend on your technology to keep you connected and help
bridge the gap between you and your medical team.
Source:
http://www.afb.org/afbpress/pubnew.asp?DocID=aw180703

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Scam watch! Scams of the week

Hello everyone and we at the business desk are introducing a new feature to
help you become more aware of those nasty scams making the rounds.
This is going to be a weekly feature and we hope that you take advantage of
our info as it will help you to stay out of the way of scams and scammers!
It’s all about scam alerts!

You need to remember that scams come in the following formats:
As emails, as phone calls both recorded and via a live caller, and o yes!
It can even show up at your door and in your mailbox.

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Before giving you the latest scams making the rounds; we have some do nots
to share with you.
Do not respond to emails that look strange to you.
Do not download attachments from unknown senders.
Do not share your username and password to your online banking and any other
online payments facilities with anyone.
Do not give out any banking or personal details on the phone to unknown
callers.
Do not pay any attention to threats from automated phone recordings or from
live persons with regard to your credit card or that you owe money to any
revenue agency.
Do not entertain any offers either via email or by phone from senders and
callers offering incredible service packages as they may pertain to cable
and tv services, prizes that you have won, or any sort of any type of
service package.
Do not answer the door to unknown callers.
Take extra caution to make sure that the details of your credit cards and
debit cards are fully protected when you make payments at restaurants or at
stores, pharmacies, and elsewhere.

Scams of the week –

1. If you receive emails from 1&1 asking you to login and verify your login
details, then you know just what to do.
This is a scam and the scammer is simply banking on you to login with your
username and password for your website.
No, no! Delete this and move on.

2. There is an email from cpanel.net advising you that your website will be
removed from their control panel facility.
Now, if you have never signed up with this organization then all you do is
to delete this email.
If you have then also delete it as such an email would never be sent you in
this way.

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Helpful tips for January 2018

Hello there and welcome to our monthly feature of all kinds of tips.
We at the business desk are pleased to bring you our monthly feature of a
plethora of tips that cover a wide range of topics.
All of our tips are designed to help you save time, cut down on your
research, and help you get ahead.
So go ahead and read on.
This week we bring you our monthly tips.
It’s what we do for a living! We help you to help yourself!
Enjoy!
From the business desk team at http://www.sterlingcreations.com.
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

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Helpful tips for January 2018

In this issue:

General tips
Articles of the day
From the pages of Donna’s travel diary
_________________________

General tips
Courtesy of the research team at http://www.sterlingcreations.ca

And here is a great tip to help you through the month of January; probably
the coldest month of January on record:
How do you know that you may be either approaching frost bite or in the
midst of it?
1. You are having chest pains.
2. You are breathing more quickly than normal.
3. Your fingers and toes are turning color!

Okay, with winter still upon us we have a home grown remedy for dealing with
a bad cold.
Mix equal parts of lemon juice and honey.
Let’s say about 2 teaspoons each.
Great about a table spoon to two table spoons of ginger depending on your
tolerance for it into the mixture.
Then boil water and pour about two cups of water over this.
Let cool, shake well, and pour into a clean bottle then refridgerate.
When you wish to use, pour into a cup, about half cup, then heat for about 1
and a half minutes in your microwave.
Sip slowly.
Drink this just before bedtime.

If you suffer from digestive problems then are two tips to consider:
1. Drink a cup of hot water right after your meal.
2. Eat a few orange sections after your meal.

A word about antibiotics:
Did you know that they can cause you to have constipation?

Protection about your privacy when it comes to paying?
It is best to pay with a credit card versus your bank debit card.
Why? Because with your debit card you can easily expose your banking
details.

An interesting bit of info about Italians at Christmas time:
They cook more fish than meat.

Right then and another tip for Christmas 2018:
If you decide to buy a live Christmas tree, then you can avoid potential
fires to it by always ensuring that its branches are kept damp.
Here is where the artificial tree may have an advantage.

An interesting fact to know before you decide to declaw your cat:
This process entails the removal of the first joint of your cat’s footeg.
It is very painful and should be carefully considered before putting your
cat through this painful process.

Some important info to know when you take your next flight:
No seat belts are to be fastened while the plane is being refuelled.
Cell phones cannot be used after the doors to the aircraft have been closed,
during the flight, and during landing.
They along with other electronic devices can only be used after the engines
have been switched off.

_________________________

Articles of the day
Chosen by the Business Desk team

Cheap, Money-Saving Winterizing Moves Worth the Hassle
http://lifehacker.com/5390242/cheap-money-saving-winterizing-moves-worth-the-hassle
That aisle at Home Depot with all the winterizing gear? It’s jam-packed with
overly-expensive stuff that might not do your home any good. Here’s a few
relatively cheap and easy moves you can make to cut
your heating bills.
Lock down your windows
In every home, there’s a trade-off between visibility and insulation
happening around each window. If you’re stuck in an apartment with windows
older than your parents, we’ll suggest a few options,
depending on what you’re hoping for in looks and permanence.
The quickest, cheapest, yet still effective solution for windows you don’t
need to look beautiful is a
bubblewrap application, as detailed by Build It Solar
.
http://www.builditsolar.com/Projects/Conservation/bubblewrap.htm
You’ll only need water and some tape to affix the fun-to-pop stuff to a
window, it still lets light through, and it’s surprisingly good at putting
hundreds of little pockets of air between your warm room and the cold
window surface. Thanks
ecelinesphyt
for the tip!
Affordable and Non-Permanent Winterizing for Apartments
http://lifehacker.com/5390058/affordable-and-non-permanent-winterizing-for-apartments#c16283967
You might have a hunch that your apartment will be all kinds of drafty this
winter, but you’re
You might have a hunch that your apartment will be all kinds of drafty this
winter, but you’re not in a position to start replacing insulation. A
valuable Ask MetaFilter thread offers many temporary heat fixes and
DIY draft fixes.
The question comes from a couple in Nova Scotia who spent a winter packed in
outdoor clothes in a ground floor apartment, yet still felt the chill.
They’ve pulled off the basics that a tenant can get away
with—plastic window covers, caulking, draft dodgers, and the like—but needed
a few more ideas. Some of the more novel answers are easily do-able: pick up
insulated curtains, move big furniture pieces
to outside-facing walls, and using temporary ceiling covers in rooms where
the heat truly seems to escape.
Other tactics, like installing a precise electronic thermostat, might
require some landlord approval or subsidizing, but can probably be
rationalized vis-a-vis energy savings when there’s no tenants present.
Don’t like your windows looking like they were just shipped from NewEgg?
Besides the self-sticking foam insulation you’ll find in every hardware
store (that you should never buy too thick) and weather-
sealing, packing-like tape, they recommend this particularly effective
solution:
My favorite (draft blocker) is Mortite caulking cord. Caulking cord is sorta
like that clay you played with in kindergarten that never dried. You can
peel strips of it off the roll and shmoosh it into any gaps
in your window.
Dodge the draft (under your door)
The space under a door is kind of necessary if you want to open it, but it’s
a fairly obvious way for heat to escape one room and float into unheated
areas where it isn’t necessary.
Draft dodgers are the slightly pun-ish name for cloth or insulation stoppers
that fit the space under a door, but still allow the door to open with
relative ease.
The Cool Tools blog points to a neat “Twin Draft
Stopper”
that runs about $10, is easily adjustable for most any door, and is
machine-washable, to boot.
Twin Draft Stopper | Cool Tools
http://kk.org/cooltools/twin-draft-stop-1/
Don’t dig the somewhat utilitarian look of retail draft dodgers? The Not
Martha blog has a picture-packed guide to a
fashionable DIY door draft stopper
.
http://www.notmartha.org/archives/2006/03/01/114123374401718192/
The
full Flickr set
shows how you can pack however much insulating foam you need, cut to size,
and seems to fit a bit more snugly than its commercial brethren.
drafty door | Flickr – Photo Sharing!
retesting
Below are 7 additional DIY Tips to Winterize Your Home for Cheap
Spircelink is below
http://www.wisebread.com/7-diy-tips-to-winterize-your-home-for-cheap
1. Clean Out Your Gutters
Gutters that are dammed up with leaves can result in ice dams, which can
lead to all kinds of costly outdoor repairs — damaged shingles, roof leaks,
broken gutters, etc. Additionally, if your gutters are clogged up, water
could be falling right
next to your foundation and leads to possible flooding in the basement.
Estimated Cost: Free, as long as you don’t fall off the roof and end up with
a medical bill.
2. Drain Your External Faucets
Water that is sitting in pipes that lead to outside faucets can freeze and
burst, ultimately flooding your basement and leading to possible water
damage and mold problems. Simply close off the interior faucet valves by
turning them clockwise all
the way to the right. Then go outside and make sure that every last drop has
come out of the faucet.
Estimated Cost: Free
3. Caulk
Search for drafts around windows and doors on a cold windy day. Place a
tissue paper over the suspected draft area. If the paper flutters, you’ve
probably located the draft. For drafts under doors, you may have to buy a
rubber draft stopper to
place at the bottom of the door.
Estimated Cost: $3/tube (One tube should be more than enough.)
http://dis.criteo.com/pump/match.aspx?c=10&uid=http%3a%2f%2fdis.criteo.com%2frex%2fmatch.aspx%3fc%3d10%26uid%3d%7bnetminingID%7d
http://dis.criteo.com/pump/match.aspx?c=10&uid=http%3a%2f%2fdis.criteo.com%2frex%2fmatch.aspx%3fc%3d10%26uid%3d%7bnetminingID%7d
4. Repair Your Shingles
If you have cracked, missing, or otherwise damaged shingles, have them
replaced immediately so that you don’t get roof leaks. Strong winds, falling
tree limbs, and sun weathering can all lead to damaged shingles. You might
as well check
them out while you’re up on your roof cleaning out your gutters.
Estimated Cost: $1/shingle
5. You can Flush Your Hot Water Heater
Any time of the year. Read very detailed directions and view visual
directions at the link below.
How to Flush a Water Heater: 13 Steps (with Pictures)
http://www.wikihow.com/Flush-a-Water-Heater
You can
flush a hot water heater
any time of year, but you might as well throw it in with the other
maintenance work you’ll be doing since you really only need to do it about
once a year. If you don’t, sediment can build up at the bottom of your
water heater and cause it to lose efficiency or even leak.
Simply take one of your water hoses and fasten it to the water faucet at the
bottom of your water heater. Turn off the water heater so that you don’t get
burned by hot water accidentally. Run the hose outdoors, preferably, but if
you can’t do that,
then a laundry tub should be sufficient. Open the valve and let the water
drain out completely, rinsing out the sediment with it.
Estimated Cost: $0.001 for the water
6. Replace Your Furnace Filter
Furnace filters, in a clean basement, can lead to a more efficient furnace
when replaced about every six months. I usually replace mine when I first
turn on the heat and then when I switch over to air conditioning in the
summer.
Estimated Cost: $5-$15, depending on the furnace
7. Programmable Thermostat
Most programmable thermostats can be purchased for $30-$70. In a cold
climate, you might be able to save that much in a month alone if you set one
up to be cooler while you are out of the house and at night, and warmer when
you are at
home. And they are easier to install than you may think (half-hour job,
max.).
Estimated Cost: $30-70
http://www.wisebread.com/favicon.ico

+++++++++++++++

Contributed by Dan Thompson
how to clean and care for a smoothtop electric cooktop
when it comes to kitchen appliances, nothing says modern and sleek like a
beautiful new electric smoothtop ceramic or glass cooktop.
while a smooth top beats a coil element type cooktop in the style
department, it requires a different kind of proactive care to keep it
looking good while at the same time
preventing discoloration and scratching.
what not to do. with smoothtop cooktops, it’s all about prevention. if you
think of your cooktop as a delicate possession that requires your utmost
protection, you’ll be way
ahead of the game.
1. do not use cast iron or stone cookware on a smoothtop cooktop or range.
period. the bottom of these types of cookware can be rough, even gritty like
sandpaper. any
movement on that cooktop can leave permanent scratches.
2. do not drag heavy pots on the cooktop. always lift to another area of
the cooktop to reduce the risk of scratching.
3. never allow abrasive cleaners, scotch-brite sponges or metal pads near
the cooktop.
4. do not allow spills to sit. clean up such spills and boil overs quickly
when cooking
5. sugary substances, take care not to spill these on a smooth top cooktop.
a sugar substance can discolor the cooktop, leaving yellowish areas that are
impossible to remove.
clean up such spills quickly.
do not stand on top of the co
6. oktop to reach something high up or place anything
heavy on a smoothtop cooktop, even for a few minutes.
7. do not place stirring utensils on a warm cooktop while you cook. food on
these utensils can mark or burn the cooktop, leaving a mess that will
require a lot of time and
effort to clean.
8. do not place bakeware like casseroles, cookies sheets (from the oven) to
cool on a smoothtop cooktop. place these items on a counter to cool.
9. how to clean. here’s the rule: if you wouldn’t use it to clean your
eyeglasses, don’t use it on your smoothtop. always reach for a soft sponge
or cloth and a cream
cleaning solution.
commercial cream cleaners. bar keepers friend now makes a cooktop
cleaner (about $6 for a 13-ounce bottle) that gets rave reviews from
manufacturers
and smooth top owners as well. another highly recommended option is cerama
bryte cooktop cleaner (about $10 for 28 ounces).
10. homemade cream cleaner. make a paste of 50/50 baking soda and blue dawn
dishwashing liquid. stir until smooth. using a sponge to work this cream in
circles over the
entire cooktop. when you’re done, rinse with a wet towel followed by a
microfiber cloth to polish the glass surface.
11/homemade heavy-duty smoothtop cleaner. this is for tough spots and any
stuck on food that spilled while cooking. combine one cup water and one cup
white vinegar in a spray bottle. add 10 drops of lemon essential oil. shake
well.
once the cooktop has cooled, sprinkle baking soda directly on the tough
spots.
spray the baking soda with the vinegar mixture. wait until the baking soda
stops fizzing and wipe clean with a very soft cloth or sponge, using the
texture of the powder to
scour off the grease. this will not scratch the surface. repeat as needed
until you’ve taken care of any tough spots.
12. remove discoloration. the natural oils and acids in food cooked on the
stovetop can leave behind dark or light stains on the surface. restoring
discoloration from a
ceramic cooktop involves proper cleaning.
follow these steps
to get your cooktop back to looking new.
a. apply a cream ceramic cooktop cleaner (see above)
b. once the area cools. rub using a soft scrubbing pad made for this
purpose (the cerama bryte ceramic cooktop cleaner kit comes with 5 cleaning
pads), rubbing deep into the
stain. the
abrasive nature of a scrubbing pad that has been designed specifically for a
glass cooktop helps release the stain to remove stubborn discoloration.
c. wipe the area with a wet paper towel or microfiber cloth.
13. remove scratches. it’s best to never allow your cooktop to get
scratched. still, if you have scratches that are visible and visually
annoying, you may be ready to bring
out the big guns. an automotive scratch remover (you won’t find anything
better than meguiar’s ultimate compound) is designed to remove scratches and
leave a clear-coat,
glasslike finish. apply the automotive scratch removing
compound with a soft cloth, and buff the scratch gently. allow the scratch
remover to dry, and then wipe off the compound with a dry cloth.
by mary hunt on 01/21/16

_________________________

From the pages of Donna’s travel diary
Traveling down town on the subway

There was a time when I used to really travel down town on the subway but
with more and more folks using said means to get to where they need to go;
it has become a real challenge for me. This is not to say that as a blind
person one cannot find ways to keeping enjoying traveling on the subway.

I’d like to offer some tips to help make things easier for those of us with
vision loss.

First off; let’s make sure that others around us are aware that we are
blind. Accordingly, we need to ensure that we travel with our canes and
that they are made visible to those around us.

Next, if we are traveling with guide dogs that our dogs are outfitted with
the relevant tags that say that they are indeed guide dogs.

We should come prepared to ask questions if we feel the need to and we need
to be able to negotiate our way through crowds and throngs.

There are of course other tips that we can benefit from but this is a good
start.

So, enjoy your subway travel.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan enjoying my travels.

To learn more about me, visit
http://www.donnajodhan.com
On your next trip you could enrich your down time with some of my audio
mysteries. Take them with you wherever you go!
In the car, on the plane, on the bus or train, at the beach, anywhere!
Affordable, portable, (computer or i device) and you could either purchase
or Subscribe for unlimited access to my library at
www.donnajodhan.com/store.html
and you can now take advantage of our free downloads here.

If you enjoy podcasts then check out my weekly one called take another 5!
From recipes to apps, and from mystery moment to tips for entrepreneur and
scam alerts!
Available for download at www.donnajodhan.com/takeanother5.html

Follow me on Twitter @accessibleworld and at author_jodhan
And like me on Facebook at
www.facebook.com/donnajodhan and at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Helpful tips for January 2018

A review of the memories of Japan restaurant

A review of the Memories of Japan restaurant – a must visit for the holidays
By Donna J. Jodhan

Introduction:
This wonderful restaurant is located at DonMills and Eglington in North York
Toronto.
It serves top notch Japanese food that you can have either a la carte or
have the shef prepare for you as you sit at the cooking table.

I have been there so many times over the years with friends and family and
each time I have enjoyed my meal.
Here is one experience that I shall always treasure.
Where the chef at the open cook table where meals are prepared in front of
the customer, this wonderful man simply made my day when he described where
he was putting various servings of food on my plate. No fuss, no muss, and
just someone who knew exactly how to communicate with me as a vision impared
person.

So how would I rate their services? With 1 being the lowest and 5 being the
highest, here are my ratings.
Service desk assistance – 4
Assistance for guests with special needs – 4
Assistance at restaurant – 4

Remarks :
For whereas there is enough room for wheelchairs and walkers to maneuver,
there is still a bit of room for improvement.

About staff:
Waitresses and waiters are quite friendly but there could be some training
given to them when it comes to communicating with persons with special needs
and except for that one great shef, they are on the whole quite friendly but
I am not sure if they are comfortable communicating with someone with a
vision impairment.

My meal:
I have always sat at the cooking table and their cooking is simply
delightful and yummy.

Any suggestions?
Just a bit of training for staff so that they are better able to communicate
with persons with special needs.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on A review of the memories of Japan restaurant

News round up of the week

Good day! It’s your Sterling Creations business desk team and we are
delighted to share the following Google headlines with you.
These headlines have been especially gathered for you to help you get a
snapshot of various important topics and subjects vying for our attention
today.
Enjoy and have a great day!

+++++++++++++++

Weekly news roundup

1. rt #news Global Online Recruitment Market International Competition and
Emerging Business Opportunities …
http://www.geopolmonitor.com/global-online-recruitment-market-international-
competition-emerging-business-opportunities-2022/

2. rt #info 25 Foolproof Ways To Get Bigger, Stronger, And More Muscular
https://www.maxim.com/maxim-man/25-ways-to-get-bigger-2017-11

3. rt #alert MARKET MATTERS: Retirement? Not so fast
http://www.registercitizen.com/business/article/MARKET-MATTERS-Retirement-No
t-so-fast-12389546.php

4. rt #news SMEs told to adapt to change, leverage on AEC business
opportunities
https://businessmirror.com.ph/smes-told-to-adapt-to-change-leverage-on-aec-b
usiness-opportunities/

5. rt #news GUEST COLUMN: Tips for caregivers to cope with the holidays
http://easton.wickedlocal.com/news/20171202/guest-column-tips-for-caregivers
-to-cope-with-holidays

6. rt #alert Workforce scrambles to keep up with aging population
http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/local/story/2017/dec/03/workforce-scrambl
es-keep-aging-population/458361/

7. rt #news Small business can help reach climate goals
https://asia.nikkei.com/Viewpoints/Vivek-Pathak/Small-business-has-big-role-
in-fighting-for-climate-goals

8. rt #info Tips for staying healthy during the holidays
https://portcitydaily.com/2017/12/04/tips-for-staying-healthy-during-the-hol
idays-nws/

9. rt #alert Cybersecurity essentials for small business owners
https://www.rnews.co.za/article/17611/cybersecurity-essentials-for-small-bus
iness-owners

10. rt #news Quick weight loss tips: Two simple steps to flatten your tummy
in less than a week
http://www.timesnownews.com/health/article/quick-weight-loss-tips-two-simple
-steps-to-flatten-your-tummy-in-less-than-a-week/140094

11. rt #alert 3 Tips for Serial Entrepreneurs to Safeguard Their Own and
Their Employees’ Retirement Security
https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/305651

12. rt #medical alert Weight Loss Really Can Reverse Diabetes, New Study
Finds
http://time.com/5048653/weight-loss-diabetes-diet/

13. rt #news Caring for the community through service to older adults
https://wydaily.com/2017/12/06/bc-caring-for-the-community-through-service-t
o-older-adults/

14. rt #news Baby Boomers riding off into the sunset
https://myaccount.news.com.au/sites/theaustralian/subscribe.html?sourceCode=
TAWEB_WRE170_a&mode=premium&dest=http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-af
fairs/health/baby-boomers-riding-off-into-the-sunset/news-story/723b326bb6a2
63d4ddd11aabca5697df?memtype=anonymous

15. rt #news China Focus: Foreign businesses chase opportunities as Chinese
economy
http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2017-12/07/c_136808906.htm

16. rt #news Bella Hadid’s Trainer Breaks Down the Ultimate Winter Workout
Routine
Bella Hadid’s Trainer Breaks Down the Ultimate Winter Workout Routine
https://www.wmagazine.com/story/bella-hadids-trainer-joe-holder-fitness

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on News round up of the week

How to help real estate agents become more aware

Hello everyone:
Each month I will be responding to a question; chosen from a pool of some of
the most commonly asked ones that I have been asked over the years and
continue to be asked.
This month, I’d like to answer the following question:
How to help real estate agents become more aware.

Most real estate agents would tell you that they are often stimied whenever
they need to interact with a client who is blind or visually impaired or for
that matter with a client with a disability. I have some tips to help you
get started and you can always add to this list as you go along.

1. Listen carefully to the needs of your client.

2. Do not be afraid to ask questions directly pertaining to the needs of
your client.

3. Before you sit down with your client, do your research to ensure that you
understand as much as you can about the disability of your client.

For example:
In the case of someone who is blind or visually impaired; you need to ensure
that they can read your documents, that they can communicate with you as
independently as possible, and that you can provide proper guiding
techniques to them if needed.

4. Get comfortable with your client. Ask them if they would like you to
provide any sort of assistance to them. IE, guiding, description of
surroundings, documents in alternate formats such as large print, or
electronically.

5. Be prepared to go the extra mile to ensure that your client is
comfortable with you. That they can trust your guiding techniques and your
descriptions of surroundings.
Too often, real estate agents missout on this aspect and as a result they
lose clients with special needs.

This should be a good start for you.

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on How to help real estate agents become more aware

Top article of the week – Self-Advocacy in the Healthcare System

Hello there and welcome to our weekly feature titled top article of the
week.
Especially chosen for you, these articles will help you to keep up to date
with current trends plus a lot more.
Enjoy!

+++++++++++++++

Self-Advocacy in the Healthcare System
Blindness and Medical Facilities, Take Two: More About Advocating for
Yourself in a Medical Situation
Deborah Kendrick
In the March issue of AccessWorld,
http://www.afb.org/afbpress/pubnew.asp?DocID=aw180302

I wrote about an unplanned hospital stay and the lessons I gleaned from
that experience. Two surprises ensued: first, I wound up returning for an
even longer hospital-and-rehabilitation tour of duty and, second, I found
out that many readers wanted to talk about navigating medical situations as
people with visual impairments or blindness. Here, then, is what we might
consider the second part of the medical adventure, in which I’ll share some
of my own experience along with what readers and others have to say. The
outcome, we hope, will be some useful preparation for all of us for the
next stressful medical encounter.
My Repeat Performance
My initial hospital and rehab adventure began with the sudden snapping of my
left femur. The bone had been weakened several years earlier by radiation
and aggravated eight months earlier by hip replacement surgery. A
prosthetic hip is like a ball on a stem. The stem is inserted into the
femur, the longest bone in the body. The procedure is akin to threading a
peg into a pipe, and my “pipe” was fragile and broke unexpectedly. The
repair that was done involved an eight-inch metal plate and several wires.
After eight weeks of mobility in a wheelchair, an x-ray determined that the
bone was broken yet again, the metal plate was at a very unhealthy angle,
and all wires were broken.
The original incident with follow-up hospital stay was in Ohio. The failure
was discovered in Florida. Consequently, finding a surgeon in Florida to do
the reconstruction was the best plan. I did find a surgeon who specializes
in hip and leg reconstructions, and he took my case. Some might find the
medical details gruesome and some might find them fascinating. If you are
the first sort, skip the next paragraph!
Since the femur had broken at exactly the point where it needed to connect
to the prosthesis, repairing it at that juncture (as the first surgeon had
done) wasn’t the best plan. The new surgeon’s approach was to tear out the
now ten-month-old prosthesis (no easy feat) and replace it with one that
had an extended “stem.” The typical hip replacement stem, when inserted into
the femur, ends near the top of the thigh. My new one ends at mid-thigh. In
addition, a cadaver bone was placed over the section of femur most damaged
by radiation and fractures (about 2.5 inches). And finally, the entire bone
was wrapped in heavy cable to hold it in place.
This second surgery meant spending one week in hospital followed by several
in a short-term rehabilitation facility. In Ohio, I had a network of
friends who visited every day and kept my spirits high and my focus off
medical issues. This time, however, I was in a state where I knew virtually
no one and thus had few diversions and no one to help me navigate the
unfamiliar human or mechanical terrain.
The night before my surgery, I found genuine solace in Googling the hospital
and surgeon. When I found the hospital on a “100 best” list compiled by a
major news organization and the surgeon identified as a respected teacher
and innovator in his field, my optimism regarding outcome soared!
In the operating room, I made sure everyone knew I wore hearing aids and
secured approval to keep them in. I explained that, because I am completely
blind, I obtain much vital information by hearing. Without the hearing
aids, that would not be possible.
My first day after surgery was spent in the intensive care unit. Once I was
aware of my surroundings, I realized that my space wasn’t separated from
the rest of the unit at all. The only thing between me and staff, visitors,
and other patients was a curtain. Consequently, it was impossible for me to
distinguish whether people were talking to me or to someone else. It sounds
silly, but when you are already vulnerable and unable to move, this kind of
thing adds yet another layer of stress and vulnerability.
The one piece of technology I had with me even in ICU was my iPhone. I’m not
sure whether I made many calls or sent messages during that phase, but I
clearly remember the sense of connection it gave me to have a working phone
in my hand.
Once I was returned to the orthopedic floor, I connected my laptop as well.
Because the greatest problems connected with blindness are, as much in a
medical facility as anywhere else, mostly related to myth and
misunderstanding, I came to appreciate my technology in its ability to
function as a bridge to understanding. A nurse or aide or physical therapist
who might at first see a blind person as strange will generally relax a bit
upon seeing a tablet or smart phone or other device that is so familiar.
Being a bit geeky, in other words, was an advantage in this environment.
Of course, my access technology had plenty of practical uses as well. In
addition to continuing to do my job after the first few days, my technology
solved a variety of small problems.
In the short-term rehab facility, I continued to find random pages of print
on the foot of my bed, the chair, the table. Usually, the KNFB Reader app
identified these for me as a calendar or note about my recovery plan. When
no one responded to my call light (which happened frequently), I took to
wheeling myself to the doorway of my room and scanning the hall with
TapTapSee to see if there were any staff nearby.
What Others Have to Say
We heard from AccessWorld readers who wanted to use the article to post in
medical employee areas or as a handout in college classes. Most
importantly, however, we heard from readers who had experienced the
“blindness meets medical situation” up close and personally, either for
their own health crisis or that of a loved one. The input was unanimous:
everyone wants more information on this topic and more of a road map for
navigating and advocating in these troubled waters.
One reader who wrote to us was Nancy Irwin, an access technology instructor
in South Carolina. Her husband, Billy Irwin, had gone to the emergency room
more than once and each time was perhaps more stressful than the one before
it. Both Nancy and Billy are blind.
Although they had gone together one of those times, the worst was when he
went alone in an ambulance. Upon arrival, Billy was seated in a wheelchair,
checked in, and pushed aside. Unclear about his surroundings or what might
happen next, he was neglected for three hours. When he vomited on the
floor, he says staff was angry with him.
Nancy caught up as soon as she could, and both reported that once he had
someone with him, the situation was somewhat diffused. The couple began
communicating with one another and others around them. Other patients, they
say, became involved in advocating for a guy who was just plain sick, like
everyone else waiting, and who needed additional information due to
blindness.
When Billy was admitted, trays of food were sometimes delivered without any
verbal information announcing the fact.
Both say that the more they interacted with nurses, the more manageable the
situation became, but it was never easy.
Ironically, Billy works as an emergency manager for amateur radio operators
in the area, disseminating emergency information to police, fire, and
medical responders, so he is no stranger to the emergency scene.
“The problem,” Billy says, “is that people just have no idea how to deal
with a blind person. They need training and they need exposure to real
blind people.”
The only marginally “accessible” piece of technology made available during
Billy’s hospital stay was the combination TV remote and call light. The
button marked with the braille “n” on the remote was the one that would
summon a nurse. Ironically, the remote was not otherwise accessible, but the
couple did contact a nurse who spent the time to familiarize them with it.
Lisa Salinger, an access technology trainer and administrative assistant for
BlindAlive, has been navigating another kind of medical facility
experience. When she realized one morning that her housemate and friend was
having a stroke, she called 911. After the hospital stay, her friend was
moved to a rehabilitation facility for therapy and Lisa was the family
member who came day after day to bring food, encouragement, and
companionship. Gradually, Lisa taught at least some nurses and nursing
aides how to interact with blind people.
Finding printed menus, calendars, or notes on her friend’s bed, Lisa took
pictures to read them with her iPhone app.
At times, when there was no one available to assist with a medical procedure
in time, Lisa motivated staff to respond by offering the alternate choice
that they teach her how to perform the task needed.
Similarly, when Billy Irwin grew tired of waiting for staff to disconnect
his IV pole every time he needed to use the bathroom, he found someone to
teach him how to disconnect it himself.
Like Lisa and Billy, others find workarounds to getting things done in a
medical facility and/or gradually gain the attention and respect of one or
two staff members who will provide needed information or hands-on
demonstration. Sometimes, though, the “soft” approach isn’t sufficient.
Tom Tobin, an Ohio fundraising professional and AccessWorld reader, recalls
a time when medical professionals had to be dismissed because there was
such a lack of respect. When he was having his insulin pump installed over
20 years ago, the attending physician showed such a lack of regard for the
patient’s ability to manage and understand his own diabetes that Tom fired
him and found another.
That Mind-Body Connection
Every stress-filled example readers have shared with me struck at least one
chord with my own experience. From not knowing food was in the room when
you are starving, to missing the printed information shouting at you from
all directions, to being a visitor and finding the elevator buttons do not
have braille on them–each minor frustration interferes with wellness.
Healing the body is assisted or hindered by the patient’s state of mind,
and when a patient feels discounted or ignored due to low vision or
blindness, the quality of their care is diminished.
So … what can we do to make interactions with medical facilities more
acceptable?
Advocate, Advocate, Advocate
One thing most of us as visually impaired people can do is talk! I was so
unprepared for what happened when first transferred from the Florida
hospital to the short-term rehab facility that I was temporarily
traumatized. I was delivered, via wheelchair, to a room and left. No
orientation or familiarization. No assurance of someone coming back in some
amount of time. I had no idea where my belongings were, where the call
light or the room phone were, or where I was! I wasn’t very strong yet nor
was I adept at propelling the wheelchair from place to place. Eventually, I
reminded myself that I could think, that I needed to be my own
cheerleader/advocate and, slowly, tentatively, began moving about the room
to explore. Suffice to say, the situation improved from there, but there
were many more moments of this variety. The longer I was there, the
stronger my conviction that I needed to depend on myself to get what I
needed. Usually, this was accomplished with a smile, but sometimes, the
gentlest among us need to get a bit tougher. Once I began exploring my
environment and getting outdoors (propelling a wheelchair without benefit
of white cane is a learning experience in its own right), my attitude
improved dramatically. My desire to get out of rehab probably expedited my
recovery!
A Little Help From Your Friends
There was a stark contrast between my hospital experience in Ohio, where I
had the support of friends, and the one in Florida, where I was pretty much
alone. If you know ahead of time that you are going to be in a hospital or
medical facility, try to line up support from family and friends in
advance. Even a casual friend or acquaintance will look out for your
individual needs more than relying exclusively on staff who have dozens of
other patients needing attention.
Use Your Technology
I kept my iPhone with me at all times and usually my laptop or braille
notetaker as well. This kind of technology can serve as tangible evidence
that you are more like than unlike the medical staff with whom you are
interacting. Asking about any technology in the room was beneficial, too. As
the Irwins pointed out, once they found someone willing to provide a
verbal/tactile tour of the remote, they were able to enjoy TV shows and
thus connect in another way with staff as well.
Explain Those Techniques
When I began using a walker in physical therapy, I asked when I could use it
on my own time, in order to build strength and practice. For several days,
my request was denied. Finally, I realized it was blindness related. The
therapist was afraid to allow me to practice walking without assistance for
fear I would crash into a wall or trip over a chair. Patiently, tediously, I
explained how I navigate a familiar environment. I had to demonstrate
repeatedly–“I touch the wall to confirm my location …” and “I touch the
door frame before turning to confirm that I am allowing sufficient space
for the walker and me …” and so on. I found myself explaining frequently
about muscle memory and echolocation, but the payoff was improved
interaction with medical professionals and decisions based on recovery
rather than misconceptions about blindness.
Use Your Power
You or your insurance company is paying for your care. If the care is
compromised by misunderstandings about your ability as a person who is
blind, change it. If your cellular service was inadequate, you would change
companies. If a medical situation becomes absolutely untenable, change it
as well.
Rx Round-up
Being in a medical facility where others control many of your simplest
activities is stressful for everyone. Adding blindness to the mix increases
confusion on both sides: the patient with the visual impairment needs
additional information and the medical professional often come to the
bedside with ill-conceived notions of a blind patient’s capabilities. There
is a profound need for training in these facilities. Perhaps some readers
will pick up this challenge and initiate trainings in their communities. In
the meantime, be your own advocate, take a friend or family member if
possible, and depend on your technology to keep you connected and help
bridge the gap between you and your medical team.
Source:
http://www.afb.org/afbpress/pubnew.asp?DocID=aw180703

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News roundup of the week

Good day! It’s your Sterling Creations business desk team and we are
delighted to share the following Google headlines with you.
These headlines have been especially gathered for you to help you get a
snapshot of various important topics and subjects vying for our attention
today.
Enjoy and have a great day!

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Weekly news roundup

1. rt #info 8 tips to stay healthy during the Christmas season
http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/your-health-your-wealth/8-tips-to-stay-healthy-during-the-christmas-season_118163?profile=1373

2. rt #news Digital Out of Home Market Size, Forthcoming Developments,
Business Opportunities, Market

Digital Out of Home Market Size, Forthcoming Developments, Business Opportunities, Market Upside and Future Investments

3. rt #alert Changing of guard in sight for city’s first responders
http://www.union-bulletin.com/news/local_governments/walla_walla/changing-of-guard-in-sight-for-city-s-first-responders/article_dd79a202-d243-11e7-ac00-b7698130198d.html

4. rt #news Danish pump giant sees plenty of business opportunity in Sri
Lanka
http://www.dailymirror.lk/article/Danish-pump-giant-sees-plenty-of-business-opportunity-in-Sri-Lanka-141124.html

5. rt #news Canada’s Aging Population To Put The Squeeze On Governments,
Young Workers: Report
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2017/11/24/canadas-aging-population-to-put-the-squeeze-on-governments-young-workers-report_a_23287578/

6. rt #news WA City Eyes ‘Baby Boomer Effect’ on First Responders
http://www.firehouse.com/news/12383213/walla-walla-wa-police-firefighters-baby-boomer-turnover-firefighter-news

7. rt #news HKTDC to Hold Four Events Next Month to Help SMEs Prepare for
the Future
http://www.asiaone.com/business/hktdc-hold-four-events-next-month-help-smes-prepare-future

8. rt #alert No company is immune: How to protect your small business from a
cyber attack
No company is immune: How to protect your small business from a cyber attack

9. rt #news Co-Living Startup Ollie Draws Aging Baby Boomers
https://seniorhousingnews.com/2017/11/27/co-living-startup-ollie-draws-aging-baby-boomers/

10. rt #info Office Perks Already old fashion? 80 Percent of Active Job
Seekers Would Sacrifice Amenities for a Job
http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20171128005297/en/Office-Perks-Pass%C3%A9-80-Percent-Active-Job

11. rt #news Lack of affordable housing, skilled workers and expanded
healthcare services identified in report

Lack of affordable housing, skilled workers and expanded healthcare services identified in report

12. rt #news Google bus brings online security tips to Rotherham
http://www.rotherhamadvertiser.co.uk/news/view,google-bus-brings-online-security-tips-to-rotherham_24743.htm

13. rt #alert Inspire212 urges businesses to implement 5 ‘Must Haves’ for
young businesses
https://www.journalism.co.uk/press-releases/inspire212-urges-businesses-to-implement-5-must-haves-for-young-businesses–/s66/a713887/

14. rt #news Global Entrepreneurship Summit Addresses Gender Bias,
Opportunities for Women
https://www.voanews.com/a/global-entrepreneurship-summit-gender-bias-opportunities-women/4142121.html

15. rt #news Job growth, not unemployment rate, to blame for help wanted
signs
http://www.timesbulletin.com/Content/News/News/Article/Job-growth-not-unemployment-rate-to-blame-for-help-wanted-signs/2/4/212904

16. rt # How Young Retirement Advisors Are Doing It Right
https://401kspecialistmag.com/young-retirement-advisors-right/#.WiCSd3mEi2w

17. rt #alert Are home security cameras ready for business use?
https://www.csoonline.com/article/3238465/physical-security/are-home-security-cameras-ready-for-business-use.html

18. rt #info Why women deserve more than a third of opportunities
http://www.businessdailyafrica.com/news/Why-women-deserve-more-than-a-third-of-opportunities/539546-4210090-xcdd1mz/

19. rt #news Growing Number Of Seniors In Canada Continuing To Work
Full-Time: Census Data
https://www.baystreet.ca/economiccommentary/2031/Growing-Number-Of-Seniors-In-Canada-Continuing-To-Work-Full-Time-Census-Data

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