Helpful tips for February 2019

Hello there and welcome to our monthly feature of all kinds of tips.
We at the business desk are pleased to bring you our monthly feature of a
plethora of tips that cover a wide range of topics.
All of our tips are designed to help you save time, cut down on your
research, and help you get ahead.
So go ahead and read on.
This week we bring you our monthly tips.
It’s what we do for a living! We help you to help yourself!
Enjoy!
From the business desk team at http://www.sterlingcreations.com.
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

+++++++++++++++

Helpful tips for February 2019

In this issue:

General tips
Articles of the day
From the pages of Donna’s travel diary

Now you can subscribe to “‘Let’s Talk Tips”‘ which is my monthly resource
for the most current and reliable
informational tips available in the areas of Technology, Nutrition, Media,
Business, and Advocacy.
http://bit.ly/ADJSubscribe

_________________________

General tips
Courtesy of the research team at http://www.sterlingcreations.ca

We start with a very important travel tip.
If you want to protect your home security then you should not be posting
about your travel location on social media.

What’s this about other uses for dish detergents?
Very true; you can use dish detergents to get rid of grease in other ways.
Car grease, grease on your clothes, and much more.

Okay, if you are having difficulty connecting to either Facetime or Skype
with your i device:
Then check to make sure that your i device and the strength of your wifi are
compatable.

Security websites?
Make sure that they have the suffix of https

What’s the latest scam making the rounds?
Someone posing as an agent from the Bill and Malinda Gates foundation!
They say that you have won a lottery to receive a huge grant from this
foundation.
No, no! Too good to be true and all you need to do is to ignore their
emails and texts.

What is the difference between black clouds and white clouds?
Apart from their colour, black clouds are often filled with water that
descends upon us as rain.
White clouds are very harmless.
Both black and white clouds travel from West to East.

What’s this about milk?
Well, some doctors that you drink a glass when taking your antibiotics pills
while others do not recommend it.
So it is best to check with your doctor.

Vitamin D?
This is known as the sunshine vitamin.

Direct flights versus indirect flights?
It costs more to travel on a direct flight.

What is the most common colour for suitcases?
Black of course but if you want your suitcase to stand out then you can put
coloured tape on it.

Another tip when traveling:
Maybe best to leave your suitcase unlocked as very often locks get broken by
those luggage conveyors.

A glass of hot water and a slice of lemon each morning?
Does a world of good for great bowel movements.
You may also want to try a squeeze of lemon if you do not have any lemon
slices on hand.

Well, a trivia question for you:
Who are the worst enemies of sheep?
O yes! it is the big bad wolf!
Finally, how can you tell that you may be suffering from a vitamin B12
deficiency?
Well, here goes.
Tiredness,
numbness of finger tips and toes,
mild mood swings,
loss of balance,
skin rashes.
How to fix this?
Visit your friendly pharmacy and pick up a vitamin B12 supplement.
Eat more green vegies and red meat.

_________________________

Articles of the day
Chosen by the Business Desk team

A Dan Thompson contribution

Clean up indoor air pollution for kids with allergies & asthma

January 30, 2013

Asthma and allergies are the most common chronic illnesses for kids in the
U.S. and attacks are often triggered by indoor air allergens, such as mold,
dust, animal dander, and chemicals in everyday products.

If your kids have allergies or asthma, then follow these easy steps to
reduce indoor air pollution in your home:

• Ventilation is crucial. “The building of tightly-sealed houses over the
last two decades has made it much easier for moisture and dust to collect in
homes,” Harvard professor Dr. Douglas Dockery notes. Many vapors trapped
indoors, from perfumes and air fresheners to formaldehyde from
particleboard, irritate asthmatics. When it’s fresh or even cold outside,
keep windows open a crack to circulate air. On hot days, close windows and
use air conditioners to ventilate and filter out smog.

• Don’t harbor dust mites. Microscopic dust mites and their droppings are a
potent allergen and asthma trigger. One of the best ways to limit the amount
of dust mites in your homes are to encase mattresses with impermeable covers
(just be sure they’re PVC-free).

• Eradicate cockroaches and keep clutter to a minimum. Piles of dirty
clothes are an ideal environment for mildew, mold, and mites; piles of paper
attract cockroaches. Keep things clean to keep these offenders away.

• Maintain humidity below 50 percent. Dehumidifying is enormously important,
as many asthmatics are highly allergic to mildew and molds. This can be
measured with a hygrometer purchased at a hardware store. Droplets of water
(condensation) on windows, walls or pipes are a sign of humidity.

• Minimize pet dander. Vacuum using a machine with a HEPA filter, dust
frequently, wash drapes and rugs regularly, wash bedding weekly, and – for
good measure – make at least one room a “pet-free” zone so your child has a
reprieve. Of course, if anyone in your home is allergic to animals, you
should reconsider having one at all.

• Keep asthmatics away from gas stoves. Open the oven door and you get a
blast of nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Your asthmatic child should not sit in the
kitchen doing homework if the oven is being used. Make sure that stoves are
well-ventilated, too.

• Buy safer products. Everything you bring into your home impacts your
indoor air quality. Choose unscented products as much as possible. Let
anything with a “new smell” air out in a well-ventilated space or outdoors.
And, watch for reactions even from natural products (essential oils can
trigger attacks, too).

• Try air cleaning and purifying machines. Consumer Reports says a good air
cleaner can help those allergic to dust and mold spores, citing the
fan/filter models as most effective in removing airborne dust. The machine
will help most in the asthmatic kid’s bedroom; but keep it at least six feet
from the bed (it creates draft), and don’t place on carpet (it can kick up
dust). But air cleaners & purifiers “only help if you’ve gotten rid of the
risk factors first, like dust mites, mold and danders,” Harvard School of
Public Health associate professor Dr. Harriet Burge warns. Warning: many
asthmatics experience irritation from the ozone type of air purifier.

Article Source:

http://healthychild.org/easy-steps/clean-up-indoor-air-pollution-for-kids-with-allergies-asthma/

To subscribe to Dan’s tips or HotSpot with God Daily Devotional, send a
blank message to dthompson5@mchsi.com and include “subscribe Dan’s Tips” or
Subscribe HotSpot with God” in the subject line.

Let love and faithfulness never leave you; bind them around your neck and
write them on the tablet of your heart. You will win favor, and a good name
with God and man.

Proverbs chapter 3, verses 3-4

No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG – www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4800 / Virus Database: 4257/8972 – Release Date: 01/21/15
Well, today I had a fight with ITunes and tried to take the matter into my
own hands. Unfortunately, I manage to disable my audio card and much more
via MSCONFIG. I had to have a sight friend come over and re-
enable somethings I accident disabled. So that is why today’s tip is so
late.
Have a great day.
Clean up indoor air pollution for kids with allergies & asthma
January 30, 2013
Asthma and allergies are the most common chronic illnesses for kids in the
U.S. and attacks are often triggered by indoor air allergens, such as mold,
dust, animal dander, and chemicals in everyday
products.
If your kids have allergies or asthma, then follow these easy steps to
reduce indoor air pollution in your home:
• Ventilation is crucial. “The building of tightly-sealed houses over the
last two decades has made it much easier for moisture and dust to collect in
homes,” Harvard professor Dr. Douglas Dockery notes.
Many vapors trapped indoors, from perfumes and air fresheners to
formaldehyde from particleboard, irritate asthmatics. When it’s fresh or
even cold outside, keep windows open a crack to circulate air. On
hot days, close windows and use air conditioners to ventilate and filter out
smog.
• Don’t harbor dust mites. Microscopic dust mites and their droppings are a
potent allergen and asthma trigger. One of the best ways to limit the amount
of dust mites in your homes are to encase
mattresses with impermeable covers (just be sure they’re PVC-free).
• Eradicate cockroaches and keep clutter to a minimum. Piles of dirty
clothes are an ideal environment for mildew, mold, and mites; piles of paper
attract cockroaches. Keep things clean to keep these
offenders away.
• Maintain humidity below 50 percent. Dehumidifying is enormously important,
as many asthmatics are highly allergic to mildew and molds. This can be
measured with a hygrometer purchased at a
hardware store. Droplets of water (condensation) on windows, walls or pipes
are a sign of humidity.
• Minimize pet dander. Vacuum using a machine with a HEPA filter, dust
frequently, wash drapes and rugs regularly, wash bedding weekly, and – for
good measure – make at least one room a “pet-free”
zone so your child has a reprieve. Of course, if anyone in your home is
allergic to animals, you should reconsider having one at all.
• Keep asthmatics away from gas stoves. Open the oven door and you get a
blast of nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Your asthmatic child should not sit in the
kitchen doing homework if the oven is being used.
Make sure that stoves are well-ventilated, too.
• Buy safer products. Everything you bring into your home impacts your
indoor air quality. Choose unscented products as much as possible. Let
anything with a “new smell” air out in a well-ventilated
space or outdoors. And, watch for reactions even from natural products
(essential oils can trigger attacks, too).
• Try air cleaning and purifying machines. Consumer Reports says a good air
cleaner can help those allergic to dust and mold spores, citing the
fan/filter models as most effective in removing airborne
dust. The machine will help most in the asthmatic kid’s bedroom; but keep it
at least six feet from the bed (it creates draft), and don’t place on carpet
(it can kick up dust). But air cleaners & purifiers “only
help if you’ve gotten rid of the risk factors first, like dust mites, mold
and danders,” Harvard School of Public Health associate professor Dr.
Harriet Burge warns. Warning: many asthmatics experience
irritation from the ozone type of air purifier.
Article Source:
http://healthychild.org/easy-steps/clean-up-indoor-air-pollution-for-kids-with-allergies-asthma/
To subscribe to Dan’s tips or HotSpot with God Daily Devotional, send a
blank message to
dthompson5@mchsi.com
and include “subscribe Dan’s Tips” or Subscribe HotSpot with God” in the
subject line.
Let love and faithfulness never leave you; bind them around your neck and
write them on the tablet of your heart. You will win favor, and a good name
with God and man.
Proverbs chapter 3, verses 3-4
No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG –
www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4800 / Virus Database: 4257/8972 – Release Date: 01/21/15
Well, today I had a fight with ITunes and tried to take the matter into my
own hands. Unfortunately, I manage to disable my audio card and much more
via MSCONFIG. I had to have a sight friend come over and re-
enable somethings I accident disabled. So that is why today’s tip is so
late.
Have a great day.
Clean up indoor air pollution for kids with allergies & asthma
January 30, 2013
Asthma and allergies are the most common chronic illnesses for kids in the
U.S. and attacks are often triggered by indoor air allergens, such as mold,
dust, animal dander, and chemicals in everyday
products.
If your kids have allergies or asthma, then follow these easy steps to
reduce indoor air pollution in your home:
• Ventilation is crucial. “The building of tightly-sealed houses over the
last two decades has made it much easier for moisture and dust to collect in
homes,” Harvard professor Dr. Douglas Dockery notes.
Many vapors trapped indoors, from perfumes and air fresheners to
formaldehyde from particleboard, irritate asthmatics. When it’s fresh or
even cold outside, keep windows open a crack to circulate air. On
hot days, close windows and use air conditioners to ventilate and filter out
smog.
• Don’t harbor dust mites. Microscopic dust mites and their droppings are a
potent allergen and asthma trigger. One of the best ways to limit the amount
of dust mites in your homes are to encase
mattresses with impermeable covers (just be sure they’re PVC-free).
• Eradicate cockroaches and keep clutter to a minimum. Piles of dirty
clothes are an ideal environment for mildew, mold, and mites; piles of paper
attract cockroaches. Keep things clean to keep these
offenders away.
• Maintain humidity below 50 percent. Dehumidifying is enormously important,
as many asthmatics are highly allergic to mildew and molds. This can be
measured with a hygrometer purchased at a
hardware store. Droplets of water (condensation) on windows, walls or pipes
are a sign of humidity.
• Minimize pet dander. Vacuum using a machine with a HEPA filter, dust
frequently, wash drapes and rugs regularly, wash bedding weekly, and – for
good measure – make at least one room a “pet-free”
zone so your child has a reprieve. Of course, if anyone in your home is
allergic to animals, you should reconsider having one at all.
• Keep asthmatics away from gas stoves. Open the oven door and you get a
blast of nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Your asthmatic child should not sit in the
kitchen doing homework if the oven is being used.
Make sure that stoves are well-ventilated, too.
• Buy safer products. Everything you bring into your home impacts your
indoor air quality. Choose unscented products as much as possible. Let
anything with a “new smell” air out in a well-ventilated
space or outdoors. And, watch for reactions even from natural products
(essential oils can trigger attacks, too).
• Try air cleaning and purifying machines. Consumer Reports says a good air
cleaner can help those allergic to dust and mold spores, citing the
fan/filter models as most effective in removing airborne
dust. The machine will help most in the asthmatic kid’s bedroom; but keep it
at least six feet from the bed (it creates draft), and don’t place on carpet
(it can kick up dust). But air cleaners & purifiers “only
help if you’ve gotten rid of the risk factors first, like dust mites, mold
and danders,” Harvard School of Public Health associate professor Dr.
Harriet Burge warns. Warning: many asthmatics experience
irritation from the ozone type of air purifier.
Article Source:
http://healthychild.org/easy-steps/clean-up-indoor-air-pollution-for-kids-with-allergies-asthma/

___________

From: “dan Thompson”
A Dan Thompson contribution

How to Keep Your Yard and Garden Pest-Free Without Harsh Chemicals

Source information links:

http://lifehacker.com/5583176/draft-keep-your-yard-and-garden-pest-free-with
out-harsh-chemicals

Companion Plantings: The Natural Way to Garden
,

http://www.companionplanting.net/

pest-resistant ornamental plants
.

http://extension.psu.edu/mercer

*Deer, slugs, and other garden destroying pests might be a part of our
natural world, but that doesn’t mean you have to tolerate them being a
natural part of your garden. These tips will keep your plants pest-free
without harsh chemicals.P

Better living through chemistry has given us off-the-shelf and
factory-manufactured solutions for any problem you can imagine. Many people,
however, want to forgo using harsh chemicals in their yards and gardens to
avoid unnecessary chemical exposure. This guide highlights a variety of ways
you can keep your landscaping lush and your gardens unmolested by pests
without having to spread toxic paste on anything or use a sprayer that
requires an OSHA-approved canister mask to use safely. We’ll start with the
easiest solutions that you can apply now-even if you’re a renter-and move
onto the more time-consuming solutions that require more advanced planning.
For the sake of readability we’ll be referring to the space you’re working
on as a “garden” for the rest of the article, but all of these methods work
equally as well on landscaping in general.

There are three primary groups that want to wreck shop in your garden:
mammals (like deer and rabbits), insects (like tomato worms), and gastropods
(like garden snails and slugs). You can find heavy artillery for dealing
with all three groups on the shelves of your local home and garden store,
but before you bust out the poisons and the neurotoxins, let’s take a look
at cheap and non-toxic ways to deter pests.

Even if you’re not particularly worried about exposing yourself to harsh
yard chemicals and you have no pets or small children, you’ve still got at
least one great reason for trying natural deterrents first: Poisoning the
lower end of the food chain like the slugs and the insects in your yard will
keep them away, but it will also deter natural predators like other insects
and birds from visiting your yard. Basically you’ll end up ensuring a cycle
wherein you have to keep applying chemicals to deal with the problem because
you’ve driven away the element of nature that was actually helping you.

Bring on the Coffee: Coffee grounds are a great addition to your garden
.
They add nitrogen to the soil, they increase the acidity for acid loving
plants, and, best of all, a wide range of creatures can’t stand coffee
grounds. Slugs hate coffee, cats hate coffee; it’s even sometimes an
effective olfactory-based repellent for picky deer. What’s that you say? You
hate coffee and have no coffee grounds to work with? Stop by your local
Starbucks and ask. They have a policy of giving away their mountains of
spent grounds for patrons to use for composting and

other projects.

*Bait, Trap, and Deter the Slugs: Slugs are, in my humble opinion, the most
annoying of garden pests. They’re the veritable ninjas of plant destruction.
Unless you’re looking for them-and carefully-it’s rare to see slugs at all,
yet every night they descend upon your garden and chew the crap out of
everything. You can deal with slugs a variety of ways depending on your
adversity to killing them or merely redirecting them to your neighbor’s
yard.P

Coffee grounds, as mentioned above, will deter slugs to a degree. Even more
effective, and radically longer lasting, is copper. Slugs and snails hate
copper. You can use copper in a variety of forms to keep them away. To keep
slugs from crawling up into your potted plants you can put decorative copper
tape around the body of the container
. You can
shield plants on the ground by buying rolls of thin copper sheeting and
making rings around the plants you want to protect-when you’re done it’ll
look like all your plants are castles in the center of little copper
fortresses. Alternatively, you can buy pot scrubbies made of copper
mesh-snip the tie in the center of the scrubbie and then uncoil the copper
mesh into a long tube to wrap around your plants. If you’re building copper
mesh barriers for lots of plants it will likely end up being more economical
to just buy a commercial roll of copper gardening mesh
.

If your attempts to deter slugs are a failure, you’ll have to start trapping
them. Slugs are, as one would imagine, as dumb as they look. You can make an
effective slug trap with little more than an orange rind
or a shallow
container and some grape juice or beer. Save the half-rinds from citrus
fruits like grape fruit and oranges and place them about your garden. Slugs
will flock to the rind. Come morning you can throw the rind in the trash or
put it on top of your compost pile to dry them out in the sun and mix them
into your compost. You can also put saucers of grape juice or beer around
the garden. The slugs will dive in and drown.

*Repel Insects with Organic Sprays: There are an abundance of organic
recipes online for insect-repelling
plant sprays. The majority of them have common ingredients like garlic
cloves, hot pepper, and sometimes the essential oil extract of either or
both. Mixtures of the two work great for repelling everything from bugs to
bunnies. This step-by-step guide

will help you make a potent garlic/pepper mix for your plants.P

*Deterring the Big Pests

If slugs are the most annoying little pests, adorable yet destructive
creatures like rabbits and deer are the most annoying big pests. A few deer
can reduce a thriving garden patch to waste or a hearty stand of hostas to
nubs in a matter of days. Unlike the simple orange-rind traps you use for
slugs, you have to be a little trickier with larger pests.

*If you can afford it and it’s feasible to do so, putting up a fence is the
only fool-proof way to keep animals out of your garden. Barring building a
rabbit-proof fence, the most effective deterrent for large pests is to scare
the hell out of them. You can spray plants with nasty tasting substances
like the garlic/pepper spray above, but that’s not as effective or far
reaching as introducing the scent of predators.P

Apply Bloodmeal Liberally: Bloodmeal is a by product of meat packing plants.
It’s dried and flaked blood and animals strongly dislike the smell of it.
Prey animals like rabbits and deer are spooked by the smell of blood, even
old dried blood. Bloodmeal is also extremely high in nitrogen and a great
additive for your garden. Sprinkle it around your plants and in your garden
beds. Take care, however, not to sprinkle the powder directly on the plants.
The high nitrogen content can burn the leaves.P

Introduce Strong Scents: If you have a strong aversion to spreading
bloodmeal all over your yard, you can also introduce other strong scents.
Deer, particularly, are not fond of really strong smells like bars of
scented soap, cheap perfume, and other strong smells. A neighbor of mine has
kept her beautiful hosta beds unmolested by deer for years now using Irish
Spring soap on stakes throughout the garden.

*Bring in the Predators: You won’t literally invite predators-your neighbors
wouldn’t approve of your use of coyotes as garden patrol-but you do want
their scent. For about $30 you can purchase fox and coyote urine. Fox urine
is great for repelling small animals like rabbits, squirrels, and skunks.
Coyote urine is great for bigger pests like deer, raccoons, and opossums.
You use it by putting a few drops every couple feet around the perimeter of
your garden and plants. A $30 bottle will last you all season even with a
fairly large yard as those few drops usually linger for a week or two
barring a heavy rain storm. If you’re curious, no, human urine doesn’t work
very well. Urban and suburban deer have adapted to the smell of humans and
don’t fear us as much as they do the smell of other animal predators.

*Scare ’em Off with Water: Scarecrow sprinklers look like regular lawn
sprinklers, except they have a battery-powered motion sensor. Anything that
gets in the path of the sensor gets a sudden and intense blast of water.
I’ve never used one personally, but everyone I know that has one swears by
them. They run $50-$75
,
but they’re great for everything from deer to squirrels to solicitors.

* This is by far the most long-term and expensive solution to pest problems.
Some plants are more resistant to attack by pests than others whether due to
bad taste, tough fibers, thorns, or other natural deterrents. We can’t
provide a blueprint for your yard, but we can provide some suggestions and
point you in the right direction. There are two schools of thought when it
comes to using deterrent plants. The first school is focused on planting the
deterrent plants as the main course in your landscaping and gardening
adventures-selecting plants right from the start that keep the deer away and
the bugs off. The second school is focused on companion planting. Instead of
giving up on the plants you love but aren’t particularly resistant to pests,
you instead plant your garden in pairings where naturally repellent plants
are located near more vulnerable plants. A common pairing in gardens is
tomato plants with oregano and basil. Not only are oregano and basil great
for tons of tomato-based recipes when it comes time to harvest, but both
plants are strongly-scented and great at repelling pests.

Your best bet is to check with your local nurseries, nature centers, and
university extension offices to see what plants grow best in your area and
afford natural pest protection.

_________________________

From the pages of Donna’s diary
Your traveling utility kit

It never hurts for you to make up and take along what I call a traveling
utility kit whenever you travel. Because trust me when I tell you that this
type of kit often comes in handy in some tight and unexpected situations.

So here goes.
For your utility kit:
Scissors, needles, black and white thread,
safety pins, buttons,
pen knife, a Swiss army knife.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan enjoying my travels.

To learn more about me, visit
http://www.donnajodhan.com

On your next trip you could enrich your down time with some of my audio
mysteries. Take them with you wherever you go!
In the car, on the plane, on the bus or train, at the beach, anywhere!
Affordable, portable, (computer or i device) and you could either purchase
or Subscribe for unlimited access to my library at
www.donnajodhan.com/store.html
and you can now take advantage of our free downloads here.

If you enjoy podcasts then check out my weekly one called take another 5!
From recipes to apps, and from mystery moment to tips for entrepreneur and
scam alerts!
Available for download at http://www.donnajodhan.com/takeanother5.html

Follow me on Twitter @accessibleworld and at author_jodhan
And like me on Facebook at
www.facebook.com/donnajodhan and at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

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