From our yum yum corner

We are pleased to bring you some fabulous recipes courtesy of Mama Peach and
now we invite you to sit back and enjoy our yum yum corner!
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

The Sterling Creations business desk team

+++++++++++++++

Simple Starters
Chicken Salsa Dip
1 (8 ounce) jar salsa, divided
1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese, softened
1 (8 ounce) package shredded Mexican blend cheese
2 to 3 boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cooked and diced
Tortilla chips
Blend half the salsa with the cream cheese; spread on the bottom of an
ungreased 9 inch pie pan. Top with remaining salsa; sprinkle with cheese and
chicken. Bake at 350 degrees for
25 minutes. Serve with tortilla chips.
Makes 8 servings.
_____
The Best Of Country Cooking:
Cooking For Two
Salad With Hot Italian Dressing
2 cups torn leaf lettuce
4 green onions, sliced
2 radishes, sliced
1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
3 bacon strips, diced
1 teaspoon all-purpose flour
1/4 cup vinegar
2 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons sugar
3/4 teaspoon Italian salad dressing mix
Arrange the lettuce, onions, radishes and tomato in salad bowls or plates;
set aside. In a small skillet, cook bacon until crisp. Remove bacon to paper
towels to drain; reserve 1
tablespoon drippings. Add flour to drippings; stir until smooth. Cook over
low heat for 3 minutes. Combine vinegar, water, sugar and salad dressing
mix; add to skillet. Bring to a boil
over medium heat; cook and stir for 2 minutes. Pour over salads. Top with
bacon. Serve immediately. Refrigerate leftover dressing for up to 2 weeks.
Makes 2 servings.
_____

5 Ingredient Family Favorites:
Breakfast And Bread Bonanza
Mexican Egg Bake
12 corn tortillas, torn
1 (16 ounce) can green chili sauce
1 (16 ounce) package shredded Cheddar cheese, divided
6 eggs
Garnish: sour cream, shredded lettuce, and chopped tomato
Layer tortillas, chili sauce and three-fourths of cheese in an ungreased 13
by 9 inch baking dish. Break eggs over top, spacing evenly. Sprinkle with
remaining cheese. Bake, uncovered,
at 350 degrees for 30 to 40 minutes. Slice into squares and garnish with
sour cream, lettuce and tomato.
Makes 8 to 10 servings.
_____

Cooking For Two
Peach Melba Dessert
1 can (15 1/4 ounces) peach halves in syrup
2 individual round sponge cakes
2 scoops vanilla ice cream
1 tablespoon raspberry or strawberry jam
2 teaspoons chopped nuts, optional
Drain peaches, reserving syrup. Set aside 2 peaches and 1 tablespoon syrup
(refrigerate remaining peaches and syrup for another use). Place each sponge
cake on a plate; drizzle with
reserved syrup. Top with ice cream and a peach half. In a small saucepan,
heat jam until melted; drizzle over peaches. Top with nuts, if desired.
Serve immediately.
Makes 2 servings.
_____

5 Ingredient Family Favorites:
Breakfast And Bread Bonanza
Sausage Squares
2 cups shredded Cheddar cheese
1/2 pound ground sausage, browned
2 eggs, beaten
1 cup biscuit baking mix
1 cup milk
Place cheese in greased 9 by 9 inch baking dish. Sprinkle sausage over
cheese. Combine eggs, baking mix and milk. Pour over sausage mixture. Bake,
uncovered, at 350 degrees for 45
to 50 minutes, or until golden. Cut into bite-size squares.
Makes 8 to 10 squares.
_____
The Best Of Country Cooking:
Cooking For Two
Peachy Banana Splits
1/4 cup flaked coconut
1/4 cup butter or margarine
1 can (8 1/2 ounces) sliced peaches, drained
1/4 cup packed brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 small firm bananas, halved lengthwise
2 scoops vanilla ice cream
2 cups chocolate ice cream
2 cups strawberry ice cream
4 maraschino cherries with stems
In a skillet over medium-high heat, brown coconut in butter. Remove coconut
with a slotted spoon and set aside. Add peaches, brown sugar and cinnamon to
skillet; cook and stir over
low heat for 8 to 10 minutes, or until heated through. Meanwhile, place
bananas in two shallow bowls. Top with ice cream. Spoon peach sauce over ice
cream; sprinkle with toasted
coconut. Garnish with cherries.
Makes 2 servings.
_____

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Rita’s iDevice Advice for May 23, 2016

Hello there! From time to time we at the business desk are pleased to bring you an article of interest and for this week we have a great one for you! We now invite you to read on! The Sterling Creations team +++++++++++++++ Contributed by Dan Thompson Rita’s iDevice Advice for May 23, 2016 What Are the Technical Differences Between Bluetooth and Wi-Fi? Too Embarrassed to Ask: Wi-Fi v. Bluetooth A few weeks ago, a very smart friend asked me how she might play music from her iPhone through an external speaker to entertain about 40 people at an event, without using any cables. I suggested a Bluetooth speaker, and showed her how it worked. But she still wondered if this was a reliable solution, because she didn’t know if the location of the event had a Wi-Fi network. As I tried to explain that Wi-Fi was irrelevant in this case, it occurred to me that a lot of people may be too embarrassed to ask what the difference is between the two widely used forms of wireless data transmission. So here goes. Both Wi-Fi and Bluetooth are found in almost every laptop, tablet and smartphone. But they’re very different, and generally used for different things. They can be on and active at the same time, doing these different things, or you can use each one separately. Wi-Fi, which originally meant "wireless fidelity," is primarily about connecting one or many devices to the Internet, or creating a local wireless network that can link multiple devices. It depends on a central base station (or multiple stations) that sends out a network signal strong enough and wide enough to cover, say, an office or home, a coffee shop or even an airport. By far the most typical Wi-Fi scenario for consumers is the wireless router installed by an Internet provider in a home. It sends out what might be thought of as invisible Internet "rays" around the house that can be tapped into by any laptops, smartphones or tablets within their range to get online. Here’s what you need to know: Bluetooth is a short-range wireless solution for pairing one device with another; Wi-Fi has greater range and works with multiple devices. Bluetooth is much shorter-range, usually around 30 feet in my experience. It rarely involves getting onto the Internet, and doesn’t depend on any central device like a router. It is almost always used to connect two devices together in some useful way. One example is that wireless speaker and smartphone my friend wanted to use. The phone and speaker talk directly to each other over Bluetooth, which beams the music from the phone to the speaker without the need for any third device or wide network. That’s why it doesn’t matter whether there’s Wi-Fi in the room. Other common examples of Bluetooth scenarios are wireless headsets for making phone calls, or wireless keyboards and mice for computers and tablets. If you’ve purchased a brand-new car in the past few years, you likely had the option of getting Bluetooth installed in your vehicle. Because Bluetooth is a direct device-to-device technology and used for so many different things, it typically requires that you first "pair" the two devices being linked. This usually involves typing a number generated by one into the other. Wi-Fi has no such pairing requirement, though you’ll need a password to access a private Wi-Fi network. Sometimes the two wireless systems can be used in ways that appear more typical of the other. For instance, if your laptop lacks an Internet connection but your smartphone has one, you can "tether" the two together to get the laptop online. And on some phones, a Bluetooth connection is one of several ways to perform that tethering. In this case, Bluetooth plays a rare role in Internet connectivity. Wi-Fi can also act like Bluetooth, connecting two devices directly over a short range. A version called Wi-Fi Direct does this. It can transfer photos and files between nearby devices, just like Bluetooth. Both Wi-Fi and Bluetooth are wireless technologies that transmit data by using radio frequency (RF) signal, but the main differences between these two are range, speed, and cost. Bluetooth is normally used to provide ad-hoc (device-to-device) voice/data transfer between mobile devices within short range, low bandwidth small data transfers (voice transfer between wireless headset and cell phone or data transfer between PDA and laptop), and some peripheral connections (keyboards, mice, printers). It is not intended to transfer large amounts of data (that require a high-bandwith, high-speed connection) and usually has a normal maximum range of 20 feet between the two objects and usually require a direct line of sight. The cost of Bluetooth devices still averages at 2x the cost of the equivalent WiFi devices. Bluetooth is found, primarily in cellular phones (including Smartphones), gaming consoles (like Playstation 3), and some of the higher end laptops. Most desktops and low to mid-range laptops, and netbooks come "Bluetooth- ready", but require an additional external adapter to actually make the connection to the devices. Wi-Fi is mainly used to provide wireless networking and Internet connection between wireless devices with a larger coverage area (up to 250 feet for areas without interference) and high bandwidth data transfers (to share high-speed Internet connections or data and files between computers connected). Many new smartphones are now also using WiFi technology as a way to cut costs on data usage (primarily on Internet, etc.) for users when they are near hotspots. All laptops, netbooks, mid to high-end Apple products, some desktops, some TVs and Home Theatre Receivers, most gaming consoles, and some personal audio devices (like iPods) all come WiFi-ready.

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Rita’s iDevice Advice for May 23, 2016

Hello there! From time to time we at the business desk are pleased to bring
you an article of interest and for this week we have a great one for you!
We now invite you to read on!
The Sterling Creations team

+++++++++++++++

Contributed by Dan Thompson
Rita’s iDevice Advice for May 23, 2016
What Are the Technical Differences Between Bluetooth and Wi-Fi?
Too Embarrassed to Ask: Wi-Fi v. Bluetooth
A few weeks ago, a very smart friend asked me how she might play music from
her iPhone through an external speaker to entertain about 40 people at an
event, without using any
cables. I suggested a Bluetooth speaker, and showed her how it worked. But
she still wondered if this was a reliable solution, because she didn’t know
if the location of the
event had a Wi-Fi network.
As I tried to explain that Wi-Fi was irrelevant in this case, it occurred to
me that a lot of people may be too embarrassed to ask what the difference is
between the two
widely used forms of wireless data transmission. So here goes.
Both Wi-Fi and Bluetooth are found in almost every laptop, tablet and
smartphone. But they’re very different, and generally used for different
things. They can be on and
active at the same time, doing these different things, or you can use each
one separately.
Wi-Fi, which originally meant “wireless fidelity,” is primarily about
connecting one or many devices to the Internet, or creating a local wireless
network that can link
multiple devices. It depends on a central base station (or multiple
stations) that sends out a network signal strong enough and wide enough to
cover, say, an office or home, a
coffee shop or even an airport.
By far the most typical Wi-Fi scenario for consumers is the wireless router
installed by an Internet provider in a home. It sends out what might be
thought of as invisible
Internet “rays” around the house that can be tapped into by any laptops,
smartphones or tablets within their range to get online.
Here’s what you need to know: Bluetooth is a short-range wireless solution
for pairing one device with another; Wi-Fi has greater range and works with
multiple devices.
Bluetooth is much shorter-range, usually around 30 feet in my experience. It
rarely involves getting onto the Internet, and doesn’t depend on any central
device like a router.
It is almost always used to connect two devices together in some useful way.
One example is that wireless speaker and smartphone my friend wanted to use.
The phone and speaker talk directly to each other over Bluetooth, which
beams the music from the
phone to the speaker without the need for any third device or wide network.
That’s why it doesn’t matter whether there’s Wi-Fi in the room.
Other common examples of Bluetooth scenarios are wireless headsets for
making phone calls, or wireless keyboards and mice for computers and
tablets. If you’ve purchased a
brand-new car in the past few years, you likely had the option of getting
Bluetooth installed in your vehicle.
Because Bluetooth is a direct device-to-device technology and used for so
many different things, it typically requires that you first “pair” the two
devices being linked. This
usually involves typing a number generated by one into the other. Wi-Fi has
no such pairing requirement, though you’ll need a password to access a
private Wi-Fi network.
Sometimes the two wireless systems can be used in ways that appear more
typical of the other. For instance, if your laptop lacks an Internet
connection but your smartphone has
one, you can “tether” the two together to get the laptop online. And on some
phones, a Bluetooth connection is one of several ways to perform that
tethering. In this case,
Bluetooth plays a rare role in Internet connectivity.
Wi-Fi can also act like Bluetooth, connecting two devices directly over a
short range. A version called Wi-Fi Direct does this. It can transfer photos
and files between nearby
devices, just like Bluetooth.
Both Wi-Fi and Bluetooth are wireless technologies that transmit data by
using radio frequency (RF) signal, but the main differences between these
two are range, speed, and
cost.
Bluetooth is normally used to provide ad-hoc (device-to-device) voice/data
transfer between mobile devices within short range, low bandwidth small data
transfers (voice
transfer between wireless headset and cell phone or data transfer between
PDA and laptop), and some peripheral connections (keyboards, mice,
printers). It is not intended to
transfer large amounts of data (that require a high-bandwith, high-speed
connection) and usually has a normal maximum range of 20 feet between the
two objects and usually
require a direct line of sight. The cost of Bluetooth devices still averages
at 2x the cost of the equivalent WiFi devices. Bluetooth is found, primarily
in cellular phones
(including Smartphones), gaming consoles (like Playstation 3), and some of
the higher end laptops. Most desktops and low to mid-range laptops, and
netbooks come “Bluetooth-
ready”, but require an additional external adapter to actually make the
connection to the devices.
Wi-Fi is mainly used to provide wireless networking and Internet connection
between wireless devices with a larger coverage area (up to 250 feet for
areas without
interference) and high bandwidth data transfers (to share high-speed
Internet connections or data and files between computers connected). Many
new smartphones are now also
using WiFi technology as a way to cut costs on data usage (primarily on
Internet, etc.) for users when they are near hotspots. All laptops,
netbooks, mid to high-end Apple
products, some desktops, some TVs and Home Theatre Receivers, most gaming
consoles, and some personal audio devices (like iPods) all come WiFi-ready.

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Twelve WebSites to inspire life long learning

Hello there! From time to time we at the business desk are pleased to bring
you an article of interest and for this week we have a great one for you!
We now invite you to read on!
The Sterling Creations team

+++++++++++++++

Contributed by Dan Thompson
Twelve WebSites to inspire life long learning

1.
Free Technology for Teachers
This web page was created by Richard Byrne, a former high school social
studies teacher and it’s a great resource for any educator.
http://www.freetech4teachers.com/
2.
Free Computer Tutorials
This website in the United Kingdom has several specific tutorials for the
intermediate to advanced computer user.
http://www.homeandlearn.co.uk/
3. TipLine – Gates’ Computer Tips
Another great blog of technology tips for teachers by James Gates: “Each
day during the school year I try to send out a computer tip or two. Please
leave a comment to let me know you were here and what you thought of
the tip.”
http://tipline.blogspot.com/
4.
The FISCHBOWL
This staff development blog was created for teachers at Arapahoe High School
in Colorado. If nothing else, check out his
“Did You Know?/Shift Happens” presentation
for some prospective on how our world is changing.
http://thefischbowl.blogspot.com/
5.
Larkin.net.au
Blog created by an Australian high school teacher that offers
technology tips
as well as resources from various
workshops for teachers
. There’s also an extensive section about
Australian POW’s in World War II
.
http://www.larkin.net.au/
6.
TeacherTechBlog.com
The stated goal of this website is to provide one or two quality tips on
how to better use technology in the classroom
. The blog is updated once or twice a week and full of useful and relevant
information. Created by a high school
teacher in Kentucky.
http://teachertechblog.com/
7.
TheTeacherList.ca
Blog for teachers who are interested in educational technology. Managed by
Pete MacKay of
Jasper Place High School
in Alberta Canada. Similar to 180techtips.com, this resource sends out
daily messages during the school year.
http://www.theteacherlist.ca/
8.
How Stuff Works
This site has been referenced in other technology tips and its a great
resource for learning about anything.
http://www.howstuffworks.com/
9.
Free Microsoft Office Training Online
This is the official training website from the Microsoft corporation for
their software. It’s probably the best resource for all their newest
products too.
https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Office-Training-Center-b8f02f81-ec85-4493-a39b-4c48e6bc4bfb?legRedir=true&CorrelationId=d0500baf-1961-45d8-8ba6-29ff9cda5836&ui=en-US&rs=en-US&ad=US
10.
Free Quotes Slides
Need a quote for your next slide show? Why not try adding a quote from this
list of free ones!
http://www.quoteslides.com/
11.
Scholastic’s Top 20 Teacher Blogs
You can find all kids of inspirationsin this continually updated list of
teacher blogs from a familiar name teacher’s trust: Scholastic Magazine
http://www.scholastic.com/teachers/article/top-14-teacher-blogs
12.
The Edublog Awards
Nominated and selected by teachers, this world-wide list of award winning
blogs is also updated annually.

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How to make distance learning more accessible

Hello everyone:
Each month I will be responding to a question; chosen from a pool of some of
the most commonly asked ones that I have been asked over the years and
continue to be asked.
This month, I’d like to answer the following question:
How to make distance learning more accessible

As distance learning grows in popularity, the demand for making it more
accessible is only going to grow and the one important thing to keep in mind
is this; accessibility goes hand in hand with usability and it is all about
an end to end process. So with this in mind, here are my tips for this
month.

1. Keep your registration process as simple as possible. You can do this
online or give the student the choice to be able to do it over the phone
with a staff member who has been trained to handle calls and queries from a
person with a disability and one who prefers to avoid the online process.

2. Make sure that texts are made available in any one of the following
accessible formats; accessible PDF, MS Word, HTML, TXT, RTF. The trick here
is to be able to accommodate the student’s needs based on their experience
with online processes along with their technical constraints. It is
important to keep in mind that students will be using a wide range of
technology so that one solution will not fit all problems.

3. Make sure that a student with a disability can write exams online being
able to access exams easily. Additionally, be ready to provide the student
with readily available technical support while they are writing their exam.

4. Students with a disability normally require additional time to write
their exams.

5. Professors need to be made aware of the needs and requirements of
students with disabilities so that if/when a student asks for additional
help/support, for texts and slides to be converted, professors are able to
handle requests easily and quickly.

6. Appropriate training needs to be provided to front end staff, professors,
and administrators with regard to how to handle requests from students with
a disability.

This list is by no means complete as there is much more that can be added
here but this is a good start.

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Using quiet nights to recharge

We are pleased to introduce to you a new monthly feature; an author’s tip from Author Donna Jodhan Author Donna Jodhan has been writing and recording her own audio mysteries since 2010 and you can now view the first two seasons of her audio mysteries along with her very special Christmas box set titled the 12 days of Christmas. These are scintillating, rivetting, and refreshing mysteries for listeners of all ages. Visit her online store at www.donnajodhan.com/store.html and there you will be able to: Purchase for very affordable prices, subscribe for unlimited access to her entire library, or download some free samples. You can follow Author Donna on Twitter @author_jodhan and like her on Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan. The business desk team +++++++++++++++ July 2016 Using quiet nights to recharge You would be amazed to learn how this technique can help in so many ways. There is nothing better than using a quiet night to do such things as relax, recharge, and reformat. A quiet night could be spent in so many ways. Anything from doing nothing to just sitting and reading a good book. Eating a quiet dinner alone or with your spouse. Sitting out in the backyard with a glass of one of your favorite drinks with your dog curled up next to your chair or your cat in your lap. Or just lying in bed enjoying the quietude. The technique of using a quiet night to help you recharge is just that; a quiet night when all that matters is just you and your thoughts. You are able to shut out the world around you; ignoring the ring of your cell phone, the notification of emails, and everything else. It has worked wonders for me and I urge you to try it some time soon.

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Using quiet nights to recharge

We are pleased to introduce to you a new monthly feature;
an author’s tip from Author Donna Jodhan
Author Donna Jodhan has been writing and recording her own audio mysteries
since 2010 and
you can now view the first two seasons of her audio mysteries along with her
very special Christmas box set titled the 12 days of Christmas. These are
scintillating, rivetting, and refreshing mysteries for listeners of all
ages.
Visit her online store at http://www.donnajodhan.com/store.html and there
you will be able to:
Purchase for very affordable prices, subscribe for unlimited access to her
entire library, or download some free samples.
You can follow Author Donna on Twitter @author_jodhan and like her on
Facebook at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan.

The business desk team

+++++++++++++++

July 2016
Using quiet nights to recharge

You would be amazed to learn how this technique can help in so many ways.
There is nothing better than using a quiet night to do such things as relax,
recharge, and reformat.

A quiet night could be spent in so many ways. Anything from doing nothing to
just sitting and reading a good book. Eating a quiet dinner alone or with
your spouse. Sitting out in the backyard with a glass of one of your
favorite drinks with your dog curled up next to your chair or your cat in
your lap. Or just lying in bed enjoying the quietude.

The technique of using a quiet night to help you recharge is just that; a
quiet night when all that matters is just you and your thoughts. You are
able to shut out the world around you; ignoring the ring of your cell phone,
the notification of emails, and everything else.

It has worked wonders for me and I urge you to try it some time soon.

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A Good Hot Cup of Coffee

Hello there! From time to time we at the business desk are pleased to bring
you an article of interest and for this week we have a great one for you!
We now invite you to read on!
The Sterling Creations team

+++++++++++++++

A Dan Thompson contribution
A Good Hot Cup of Coffee

So you like coffee. A lot. Me too. I like it so much I’m a home roaster. And
an importer. That’s right. I import green coffee beans direct from the La
Minita plantation in the
Tarrazu region of Costa Rica. Why? Well, because (get ready) it’s the best
inexpensive way to enjoy the best organic, free-trade, gourmet coffee on
earth.
Apparently, I am not the only coffee lover in our EC family. You send me
lots of questions and comments on the subject. Here one:
Which coffeemaker makes coffee the hottest and then keeps it hot without
burning
it?
“Hot” is a nebulous term when it comes to coffee. For McDonalds, hot meant a
big lawsuit when its hot coffee burned a customer who spilled it in her lap.
For my grandson Eli,
hot means anything even slightly warmer than tepid.Coffee aficionados insist
that the water temperature for a drip coffee brewer needs to be hot at
exactly 179 F. the moment
it hits the coffee grounds. Personally, I find
that to be on the cool side, which confirms “hot” is a matter of personal
taste.
Automatic drip coffee makers have an internal thermostat to control the
water temperature and they range from 155 F. to 205 F. depending on the make
and model. Most machines
will not allow the customer to change this setting-a feature most of us don’t
think about when selecting a coffeemaker.
Manual coffee makers like Chemex (8-cup about $36) and Aeropress (about $30)
leave this matter up to the brewer. When I use my Aeropress, I heat the
water to
boiling, then allow it to cool for just a few minutes until my instant read
thermometer hits 190 F. Using this method I make only the amount we will
consume immediately.
Keeping it hot is not an issue.
OXO 9-CUP COFFEEMAKER. This beautiful machine dispenses coffee into a
thermo carafe, which keeps the coffee hot for Water is heated and held
throughout the brew cycle at 197.6 to 204.8 F. The carafe will keep coffee
for an hour or two (not
hot, as I define the word). This machine does make an excellent cup of hot
coffee and gets very high marks with hundreds of reviewers. About $200.
BUNN 13000 12-CUP. This is the coffeemaker I own and use almost
continuously.
Bunn keeps water heated to 191 F. and ready to go at all times. That means
when I pour the fresh pot of water into the machine to brew a pot of coffee,
I’d better have the
coffee grounds in the basket and ready to go because hot coffee begins
pouring into the pot instantaneously. This machine makes up to 12 cups of
coffee
into a glass carafe and the warmer keeps it hot. We live at a semi-high
elevation of 5,280 ft., and this machine works flawlessly. I have owned so
many coffeemakers in my
life-loved some, hated others-all of which finally failed. I do not plan on
replacing this beautiful Bunn machine in the foreseeable future. It is
trouble free,
highly dependable and makes fabulous coffee. It cannot be beat. And it looks
cool, too. About $260.
Neither of these two automatic coffeemakers that brew hot coffee are cheap.
However, both are inexpensive when you consider you will not be replacing
either one, for a very long time, if ever.
For a true coffee lover, a coffeemaker is an investment in one of life’s
pleasures.
The joys of a good cup of coffee cannot be overstated.
Mary Hunt’s Everyday
Cheapskate blog,
www.everydaycheapskate.com

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Helpful tips for July 2016

Hello there and welcome to our monthly feature of all kinds of tips.
We at the business desk are pleased to bring you our monthly feature of a
plethora of tips that cover a wide range of topics.
All of our tips are designed to help you save time, cut down on your
research, and help you get ahead.
So go ahead and read on.
This week we bring you our monthly tips.
It’s what we do for a living! We help you to help yourself!
Enjoy!
From the business desk team at http://www.sterlingcreations.com.
Follow us on Twitter @accessibleworld

+++++++++++++++

Helpful tips for July 2016

In this issue:

General tips
Articles of the day
From the pages of Donna’s travel diary
_________________________

General tips
Courtesy of the research team at http://www.sterlingcreations.ca

Some interesting facts courtesy of Dan Thompson:
1. Largest flower
The Corpse flower, also known as Rafflesia arnoldii. The poetically named
posy boasts the largest bloom in the world, measuring in at 3-feet wide with
blossoms that weigh 15
pounds.
2. The largest animal
The blue whale. When a baby blue whale is born, it measures up to 25 feet
and weighs up to three tons. Growing to lengths of up to 100 feet and
weighing up to 200 tons, the
blue whale is, in fact, the biggest animal known to live on Earth.
3. The largest land animal
The African bush elephant holds the title for largest land animal. Reaching
lengths of up to 24 feet and gaining heights of 13 feet, these beautiful
gray beasts weigh in at 11
tons. Their trunks alone can lift objects of more than 400 pounds.
4. The largest tree by volume
The world’s largest tree is a stately giant sequoia, known as General
Sherman in California’s Sequoia National Park. This majestic arboreal master
is about 52,500 cubic feet
in volume.
5. The largest invertebrate
The aptly named colossal squid is the world’s largest squid species and the
largest invertebrate on the planet. They can weigh as much as 1,000 pounds
and can grow to 30 feet
long. That’s a lot of calamari.
6. The tallest land animal
The title of the world’s tallest mammal belongs to the giraffe. The legs of
these even-toed ungulates are taller than many people. Giraffes can grow to
heights of 19 feet and
can weigh as much as 2,800 pounds. They can sprint up to 35 miles-an-hour
over short distances.
7. The largest reptile
As the largest of living reptiles – as well as the largest terrestrial and
riparian predator in the world – the saltwater crocodile can reach lengths
of 22 feet and can weigh
in at 4,400 pounds.
8. The heaviest bird
The ostrich is the world’s heaviest bird, with a weight of 350 pounds and a
height of 9 feet. While they cannot fly, they can sprint up to 43 miles an
hour and run long
distance at 31 miles an hour.
9. The largest thing of all
In 1998 a single colony of honey fungus was discovered in the Malheur
National Forest in east Oregon that covered an area of 3.7 square miles, and
occupied some 2,384 acres.
The discovery was remarkable in that not only would the massive specimen be
recognized as the world’s largest known organism, but based on its growth
rate, the fungus is
estimated to be 2,400 years old – and maybe as old as
8,650 years – making it one of the planet’s oldest living organisms as well.

Some tips when you think of weighing yourself:
Try using the same scale each time you weigh yourself.
Weigh on the same day of the week and at around the same time.

A tip about bees:
You’re more likely to get stung by a bee on a windy day than in any other
weather.

_________________________

Articles of the day
Chosen by the Business Desk team

A Dan Thompson contribution
How to Keep Your Yard and Garden Pest-Free Without Harsh Chemicals

Source information links:

http://lifehacker.com/5583176/draft-keep-your-yard-and-garden-pest-free-with
out-harsh-chemicals

Companion Plantings: The Natural Way to Garden
,

http://www.companionplanting.net/

pest-resistant ornamental plants
.

http://extension.psu.edu/mercer

*Deer, slugs, and other garden destroying pests might be a part of our
natural world, but that doesn’t mean you have to tolerate them being a
natural part of your garden. These tips will keep your plants pest-free
without harsh chemicals.P

Better living through chemistry has given us off-the-shelf and
factory-manufactured solutions for any problem you can imagine. Many people,
however, want to forgo using harsh chemicals in their yards and gardens to
avoid unnecessary chemical exposure. This guide highlights a variety of ways
you can keep your landscaping lush and your gardens unmolested by pests
without having to spread toxic paste on anything or use a sprayer that
requires an OSHA-approved canister mask to use safely. We’ll start with the
easiest solutions that you can apply now-even if you’re a renter-and move
onto the more time-consuming solutions that require more advanced planning.
For the sake of readability we’ll be referring to the space you’re working
on as a “garden” for the rest of the article, but all of these methods work
equally as well on landscaping in general.

There are three primary groups that want to wreck shop in your garden:
mammals (like deer and rabbits), insects (like tomato worms), and gastropods
(like garden snails and slugs). You can find heavy artillery for dealing
with all three groups on the shelves of your local home and garden store,
but before you bust out the poisons and the neurotoxins, let’s take a look
at cheap and non-toxic ways to deter pests.

Even if you’re not particularly worried about exposing yourself to harsh
yard chemicals and you have no pets or small children, you’ve still got at
least one great reason for trying natural deterrents first: Poisoning the
lower end of the food chain like the slugs and the insects in your yard will
keep them away, but it will also deter natural predators like other insects
and birds from visiting your yard. Basically you’ll end up ensuring a cycle
wherein you have to keep applying chemicals to deal with the problem because
you’ve driven away the element of nature that was actually helping you.

Bring on the Coffee: Coffee grounds are a great addition to your garden
.
They add nitrogen to the soil, they increase the acidity for acid loving
plants, and, best of all, a wide range of creatures can’t stand coffee
grounds. Slugs hate coffee, cats hate coffee; it’s even sometimes an
effective olfactory-based repellent for picky deer. What’s that you say? You
hate coffee and have no coffee grounds to work with? Stop by your local
Starbucks and ask. They have a policy of giving away their mountains of
spent grounds for patrons to use for composting and

other projects.

*Bait, Trap, and Deter the Slugs: Slugs are, in my humble opinion, the most
annoying of garden pests. They’re the veritable ninjas of plant destruction.
Unless you’re looking for them-and carefully-it’s rare to see slugs at all,
yet every night they descend upon your garden and chew the crap out of
everything. You can deal with slugs a variety of ways depending on your
adversity to killing them or merely redirecting them to your neighbor’s
yard.P

Coffee grounds, as mentioned above, will deter slugs to a degree. Even more
effective, and radically longer lasting, is copper. Slugs and snails hate
copper. You can use copper in a variety of forms to keep them away. To keep
slugs from crawling up into your potted plants you can put decorative copper
tape around the body of the container
. You can
shield plants on the ground by buying rolls of thin copper sheeting and
making rings around the plants you want to protect-when you’re done it’ll
look like all your plants are castles in the center of little copper
fortresses. Alternatively, you can buy pot scrubbies made of copper
mesh-snip the tie in the center of the scrubbie and then uncoil the copper
mesh into a long tube to wrap around your plants. If you’re building copper
mesh barriers for lots of plants it will likely end up being more economical
to just buy a commercial roll of copper gardening mesh
.

If your attempts to deter slugs are a failure, you’ll have to start trapping
them. Slugs are, as one would imagine, as dumb as they look. You can make an
effective slug trap with little more than an orange rind
or a shallow
container and some grape juice or beer. Save the half-rinds from citrus
fruits like grape fruit and oranges and place them about your garden. Slugs
will flock to the rind. Come morning you can throw the rind in the trash or
put it on top of your compost pile to dry them out in the sun and mix them
into your compost. You can also put saucers of grape juice or beer around
the garden. The slugs will dive in and drown.

*Repel Insects with Organic Sprays: There are an abundance of organic
recipes online for insect-repelling
plant sprays. The majority of them have common ingredients like garlic
cloves, hot pepper, and sometimes the essential oil extract of either or
both. Mixtures of the two work great for repelling everything from bugs to
bunnies. This step-by-step guide

will help you make a potent garlic/pepper mix for your plants.P

*Deterring the Big Pests

If slugs are the most annoying little pests, adorable yet destructive
creatures like rabbits and deer are the most annoying big pests. A few deer
can reduce a thriving garden patch to waste or a hearty stand of hostas to
nubs in a matter of days. Unlike the simple orange-rind traps you use for
slugs, you have to be a little trickier with larger pests.

*If you can afford it and it’s feasible to do so, putting up a fence is the
only fool-proof way to keep animals out of your garden. Barring building a
rabbit-proof fence, the most effective deterrent for large pests is to scare
the hell out of them. You can spray plants with nasty tasting substances
like the garlic/pepper spray above, but that’s not as effective or far
reaching as introducing the scent of predators.P

Apply Bloodmeal Liberally: Bloodmeal is a by product of meat packing plants.
It’s dried and flaked blood and animals strongly dislike the smell of it.
Prey animals like rabbits and deer are spooked by the smell of blood, even
old dried blood. Bloodmeal is also extremely high in nitrogen and a great
additive for your garden. Sprinkle it around your plants and in your garden
beds. Take care, however, not to sprinkle the powder directly on the plants.
The high nitrogen content can burn the leaves.P

Introduce Strong Scents: If you have a strong aversion to spreading
bloodmeal all over your yard, you can also introduce other strong scents.
Deer, particularly, are not fond of really strong smells like bars of
scented soap, cheap perfume, and other strong smells. A neighbor of mine has
kept her beautiful hosta beds unmolested by deer for years now using Irish
Spring soap on stakes throughout the garden.

*Bring in the Predators: You won’t literally invite predators-your neighbors
wouldn’t approve of your use of coyotes as garden patrol-but you do want
their scent. For about $30 you can purchase fox and coyote urine. Fox urine
is great for repelling small animals like rabbits, squirrels, and skunks.
Coyote urine is great for bigger pests like deer, raccoons, and opossums.
You use it by putting a few drops every couple feet around the perimeter of
your garden and plants. A $30 bottle will last you all season even with a
fairly large yard as those few drops usually linger for a week or two
barring a heavy rain storm. If you’re curious, no, human urine doesn’t work
very well. Urban and suburban deer have adapted to the smell of humans and
don’t fear us as much as they do the smell of other animal predators.

*Scare ’em Off with Water: Scarecrow sprinklers look like regular lawn
sprinklers, except they have a battery-powered motion sensor. Anything that
gets in the path of the sensor gets a sudden and intense blast of water.
I’ve never used one personally, but everyone I know that has one swears by
them. They run $50-$75
,
but they’re great for everything from deer to squirrels to solicitors.

* This is by far the most long-term and expensive solution to pest problems.
Some plants are more resistant to attack by pests than others whether due to
bad taste, tough fibers, thorns, or other natural deterrents. We can’t
provide a blueprint for your yard, but we can provide some suggestions and
point you in the right direction. There are two schools of thought when it
comes to using deterrent plants. The first school is focused on planting the
deterrent plants as the main course in your landscaping and gardening
adventures-selecting plants right from the start that keep the deer away and
the bugs off. The second school is focused on companion planting. Instead of
giving up on the plants you love but aren’t particularly resistant to pests,
you instead plant your garden in pairings where naturally repellent plants
are located near more vulnerable plants. A common pairing in gardens is
tomato plants with oregano and basil. Not only are oregano and basil great
for tons of tomato-based recipes when it comes time to harvest, but both
plants are strongly-scented and great at repelling pests.

Your best bet is to check with your local nurseries, nature centers, and
university extension offices to see what plants grow best in your area and
afford natural pest protection.

+++++++++++++++

A Dan Thompson contribution
CLOTHING CARE & SEWING TECHNIQUES

Date: September-04-14 9:49 AM

Today’s article was published in 2010. However, I believe techniques
mentioned

Are not time specific. It is considerably useful to be remindedhow to carry
out tasks many think of no big deal or even learn for the first time. The
techniques are beneficial for youth and on into the autum of our lives. God
bless and have a great successful, faith filled day.

CLOTHING CARE & SEWING TECHNIQUES

by Carol Woodward, former Homemaking Teacher

Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Austin, Texas

February 19 2010

CLOTHING CARE & SEWING TECHNIQUES FOR VISUALLY IMPAIRED OR TOTALLY BLIND
STUDENTS

by Carol Woodward, former Homemaking Teacher
Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, Austin, Texas

Revised March 1998

Marking Clothes

Coordinating one’s wardrobe can be accomplished with the following
techniques:

A. Safety Pins

This method uses small safety pins to identify colors in clothing.

Let the students make up their own system for colors and their positions. It
involves placing a safety pin in a specific hidden spot for each color on
each garment. For example:

. For shirts – tail, side seams, cuffs (side w/button or side
w/hole), middle inside collar, under collar points, middle back tail

. For pants – waistband to match the position of color on matching
shirt (e.g., blue shirt with pin on left front tail and matching blue pants
w/pin on left front waistband)

. For socks – on top at the back or front, outside on instep (a
preferred method is to pin matching socks together with a large safety pin
when they are taken off, washed, and put away; then unpin when socks are
worn; to match a special pair of socks to a piece of clothing, pin the socks
to the piece when taking them off and wash with the garment)

B. French Knots or Yarn Knots

This method is similar to the use of safety pins, marking in different area
for different colors.

The students should decide on the code used. The knots could stand for the
Braille color names, for numbers, or have different shapes (e.g., squares,
triangles, circles).

Note: Most people have more clothes of one color than another. The prevalent
color could be identified with no pins or markings. For clothes which
coordinate with several colors, such as plaids, mark each color in the
appropriate spot (e.g., left front for blue, side seam for green).

C. Commercially Available Products

Maxi Aids, PO Box 3209, Farmingdale, NY 11735,
phone 1-800-522-6294 or 516-752-0521, fax 516-752-0689:

. Do-Dots: These clear plastic braille buttons (1 male, 1 female)
snap together easily and nondestructively through hem, cuff, or collar. One
side of the button tells you the design (light, dark, print, plaid, stripes,
plain). The other side tells you the color (45 different colors). A
braille-coded key to the abbreviations is included. They are in packages of
100 for $51.95.

. “Say What”: Made of strong plastic, these tags are reusable by
changing the desired information on a removable label. Each kit contains 10
tags and enough 1/2 inch braille tape for 23 labels. The tags measure 1 1/2″
x 5 3/4″ and cost $4.95.

. Match Makers: Special plastic covers with large tactual dots are
bonded to nickel plated safety pins. Count the number of dots to find
matching clothing. 200 pins are available for $37.50.

Independent Living Aids, 27 East Mall,
Plainview, NY 11803, phone 1-800-537-2118, fax 516-752-3135:

. Thick Sock Locks: These plastic squares with gripper holes will
keep socks paired in the washing machine, dryer, and sock drawer. They are
in packages of 20 for $1.75.

Lighthouse Enterprises,
36-20 Northern Blvd., Long Island City, NY 11101, phone 1-800-829-0500, fax
212-821-9727:

. Teflon Scott Tape: This tape can be brailled on a slate, cut to
size, and sewn into clothing items. The tape is 1/2 inch wide and 5 feet
long and costs $2.95 per roll.

Maggie’s Sew Free Buttons, P.O. Box 54,
DeWitt, NY 13214

Threading a Needle

A. Self-Threading Needles

Self-threading needles have two holes, one of which is open. The thread is
placed across the top and pushed down through a slit into the second hole.
There are several hand positions that can be used to thread the needle while
holding it in your hand. The recommended method is to place a pin cushion on
the table with the needle stuck straight into it. This allows two free hands
to hold onto the thread. Wrap the thread around the two index fingers and
use the thumbs to locate the position of the needle in the pin cushion, then
push the thread down onto the needle. A disadvantage of self-threading
needles is that the thread pulls out of the slit in the needle very easily.

B. Wire Needle Threaders

Wire needle threaders can be purchased in packages of three for about $1. To
use this, push the triangular shaped wire through the eye of the needle, put
the thread through the triangle, and pull the wire back through the needle
with the thread. These may be difficult to use for some students because the
wire has to be pushed through the eye of the needle first and the wire may
bend or a student may not find the hole in the needle. My students like to
wrap the thread around a straight pin and stick the straight pin through the
wire loop. This gives the student something stiff to stick through the wire
triangle instead of the limp thread.

Dental Floss Threader Wire Needle Threader

C. Dental Floss Threaders

Dental floss threaders can be purchased in packages of 20 from the drugstore
for about $2 – $3. My students prefer these threaders over the wire needle
threaders because they are stiff enough to easily thread into the eye of the
needle and the loop is flexible, unbreakable, and large enough to feed the
thread through. The loop is pulled through the needle from front to back.

Using Scissors

To teach a student with visual impairment how to hold and use scissors:

1. Put the scissors in your own hand and let the student feel the hand
position and the cutting movement (hand-over-hand, student’s hand on top).

2. Let the student hold the scissors and put your hand around the student’s
hand to help guide while cutting (hand-over-hand, teacher’s hand on top).

3. Let the student practice cutting on raised line paper until the student
is able to cut along the line.

Note: Some students’ hands are too weak to cut through two thicknesses of
fabric. Let these students cut one thickness at a time. Electric scissors
are sometimes helpful.

Patterns and Fabrics

A. How to Make Your Own Patterns

For students who have poor tactual discrimination, I recommend making
patterns out of heavy brown paper or butcher paper, using conventional
tissue paper patterns as guides or creating your own:

. Outline the edges with a 1/4 inch line of Elmer’s glue.

. Mark the straight grainline arrows with a strip of 1/2 inch
masking tape or brightly colored labeller tape.

. Put a strip of masking tape folded over the paper edge to identify
the lay on the fold.

. The crosswise grainline arrow can be marked with a strip of
masking tape with staples at each end.

. The bias grainline can be a strip of masking tape with staples
lengthwise along one side of the tape.

. Use staples to identify the location of notches. For beginners, I
sometimes omit the notches completely to avoid confusion.

. To identify darts, make a heavy glue outline and put a staple at
the point and at the two ends.

Note: The pattern number, size, and pattern piece could be marked on each
pattern piece in braille or large print.

B. Adapting Conventional Patterns

1. For tactual markings:

o Before trimming any excess margins off tissue paper patterns, put an
Elmer’s Glue line on the cutting lines. Let dry overnight. To keep the
tissue paper from sticking to the counters, I put scotch tape on the wrong
side of the pattern piece along the cutting lines.

o Mark these patterns with masking tape as described above.

o The student should be able to tear off the excess margins outside the
glue lines before pinning the pattern on the fabric. Otherwise, I cut off
the excess margins outside the glue lines.

Note: This is the method that I use in my clothing classes. You will need
plenty of counter space.

2. For visual markings: Use a color broadtipped felt pen and retrace all
the cutting lines and special markings, such as darts, dots, and pocket
placement lines, etc. It is easier to do this before the excess margins have
been cut off of the tissue paper pattern. I usually ask the students what
color is best.

C. Patterns Available for Visually Impaired Users

Fingertip Patterns, 155 North Bellaire Avenue, Louisville, Kentucky 40206.

These patterns are specifically made for the blind. All of the markings are
in braille. However, the paper used is similar to butcher paper and it is
sometimes difficult to feel the edge of the paper when cutting the fabric
(no glue lines). I understand this company has pattern catalogs available
per request. For a fee, an adapted pattern can be made if you send a
store-bought pattern to the company. Unfortunately, it takes over six weeks
to get the pattern back.

D. Buying Fabric

Students should be encouraged to learn to differentiate textures and weaves
of various types of fabrics (e.g., cottons, double knits, wool). A trip to a
fabric store should include opportunities to tactually explore fabric.
Describe the characteristics of different fabrics verbally to the students.
Help them pick a pattern, or practice soliciting help of a sighted person,
and practice buying the fabric and all the sewing notions needed, and paying
for the purchase.

E. Transferring Patterns Fabric

Make all necessary adaptations (e.g., glue lines or colored felt-tip lines).
From this point on, the student should be able to lay out the pattern (using
the masking tape grainline arrows as guides), pin the pattern to the fabric,
and cut out the pieces. For beginners, I recommend simple projects, such as
an apron, tote bag, poncho, skirt with elastic in the waistline, pants with
drawstring or elastic in the waistline or a “torn project” (where the
student tears out the pieces rather than cutting out the pieces). I strongly
recommend that the fabric chosen be a woven polyester and cotton fabric.

Only special markings such as darts, dots, pocket placement lines, or
notches need to be marked on the fabric. Darts can be identified by placing
a small safety pin at the point and at each end, where the staples were on
the adapted paper pattern . When the darts are ready to be sewn, the safety
pins are replaced with straight pins. I sometimes have my beginners trace
the pattern markings with a tracing wheel on tracing paper, in addition to
the safety pins, so they will be familiar with that technique.

Machine Sewing

A. Pinhead Guide

The use of a pinhead guide helps the blind student sew straight. Place a row
of straight pins horizontally onto the sticky side of a piece of masking
tape. Let the heads of the pins extend over one side. Place another piece of
masking tape with the nonsticky side directly over the pins. Stick the
pinhead guide to the metal slide plate on the sewing machine.

The placement of the pinhead guide may vary depending on the task (regular
seam at 5/8 inch, staystitching at 1/2 inch, topstitching at 1/4 inch). A
notched metal seam gauge, similar to a 6-inch ruler, but with indented
notches at each half-inch mark, can be used to aid the placement of the
pinhead guide. Most sewing machines come with an etched line on the metal
slide plate that marks the 5/8 inch regular seam line. Most students can
feel this line and place the pinhead guide on it. When beginning to sew, the
fabric is lined up with the first pin on the pinhead guide (which is even
with the machine needle).

B. Metal Seam Guide

Most sewing machines have a screw hole to the right of the needle for a
metal seam guide that functions like the pinhead guide. These metal seam
guides are also available in a magnetic form. I prefer the screw on type
because the magnetic ones tend to move out of position. Some of my students
use a combination of the screw on type seam guide and magnetic guide (or
pinhead guide) in order to make a longer edge for the fabric to move
against.

C. Needle Finger Guard

This is a small 3-sided metal bar attached to the sewing machine on the same
bar as the presser foot near the needle. It is a safety device to warn the
user that the needle is close by. The finger guard is pulled down in front
of the needle when sewing and pushed up to the left of the needle when
threading. Most new sewing machines have a finger guard.

D. Seams

Have your students pin the pieces of fabric together with straight pins
parallel to the fabric edge with the points of the pins pointing toward the
needle of the sewing machine. This makes it easier for the student to pull
the pins out of the fabric and it gives the student a better idea of where
the stitching line will be. I recommend using pins with large colored
plastic heads. Beginners should practice sewing two pieces of Braille paper
together first, using the metal seam guide to sew straight.

E. Darts

If the darts were marked with safety pins, fold the dart in half by making
the safety pins even. Replace the safety pins with straight pins and put a
straight line of pins from the wide end to the point by using the seam gauge
or ruler as a straight edge. Place the pinhead guide directly in front and
in line with the needle and presser foot. Start at the wide end of the dart
(at the fabric edge) and begin stitching, holding the pins in the fabric
flat against the pinhead guide and remove the pins one by one to the point
of the dart.

Hems

Mark the length desired with a pin. Measure the fabric to be turned up with
the notched seam gauge and pin up the entire hem. Press the pinned up hem.

A. Sewing Hems with the Sewing Machine

Whenever possible, use the sewing machine to sew in hems. Use the metal seam
guide or pinhead guide, placing it as far from the needle as the depth of
the hem, and stitch.

B. Ironing Hems with Stitch Witchery

This is an iron-on adhesive, mesh-like material available in strips or by
the yard. The strips are easiest to use for hems. After pressing the hem up,
remove the straight pins and place the Stitch Witchery between the fabric
and iron.

C. Sewing Hems by Hand

Thread a needle using a double thread. A single thread comes off the needle
too frequently. Hold the hem in one hand with the thumb on the pinned hem
edge. With the other hand, put the needle through the fabric until the point
just touches the index finger and then push the needle back up through the
fabric. Position the thumb so that the first stitch is on one side of the
thumb. Now take the second stitch on the other side of the thumb. Continue
around the hem, using the thumb as a guide for the size of the stitch to
make.

Ironing Clothes

A. Safety Techniques

Teach the student how to turn the iron on and off, the positions of basic
temperature settings, how to add water to steam irons, how to set the iron
down when it is hot, and which parts of the iron get hot. With a cold iron,
show the student how to hold the iron correctly. Teach students to put the
iron down by keeping the forearm straight out with the elbow next to the
body. To find the iron again after putting it down, trail up the ironing
board on the side closest to the body or find the cord and go up the cord to
the handle.

B. How to Iron a Shirt

* Iron the collar first by putting the collar wrong side up on the
ironing board with the seam on the outer edge of the ironing board (side
away from body). Hold it in place with your hip and pin the corners of the
collar down with straight pins, then iron. Remove the pins.
* Iron the shoulders and, if applicable, yoke by inserting the tip of
the ironing board. Hold at the collar and at the bottom of the yoke or pin
the yoke down (with the collar closest to your body). Remove the pins.
* Iron the sleeves by finding the underarm seam and folding along that
seam. Pin the sleeve to the ironing board and iron. Push the iron sideways
toward the collar to feel when the side of the iron reaches the armhole seam
(and avoid ironing the collar again). Remove the pins.
* Iron the body of the shirt, starting with the button side of the
front. Pin the tail of the shirt down and hold onto the collar as you iron.
When finished ironing a section, unpin it, slide the far edge of the shirt
at top and bottom toward the edge closest to your body to position an
unironed section. Pin this unironed section down and iron. Continue in this
fashion around the shirt. When ironing the body of the shirt near the
armholes, slide the shirt so that the end of the ironing board is sticking
inside the top of the sleeve. This will keep the shirt flat on the ironing
board.

Folding Clothes

A. Folding Shirts

First button every other button and the cuffs, if applicable. To find the
top of the shirt, put your hand inside the top of each sleeve. Shake out the
shirt holding onto the top of it. Lay shirt face down on a table with the
collar to the left. Pull the sleeves out to the sides uncreasing the body as
much as possible. Bring the body of the shirt close to the edge of the
table. Put the index finger side of the left hand next to the collar (right
side of shirt), fingers pointing to the shirt tail, and fold over right side
of shirt. Fold the right sleeve lining it up lengthwise with the shirt.
Repeat for left side of shirt. Bring the tail end of the shirt up to the
collar to fold in half lengthwise, or fold in thirds by bringing the tail
end up one third and then fold again in half.

B. Folding Creased Pants

By holding the bottom of each pants leg put the seams together, making sure
the inside seams are touching. Hold the bottom of the legs and put under
your chin. Bring the waist of the pants up and fold in half, or hold on to
each end and bring hands together.

Hanging Clothes

A. Hanging Shirts and Dresses

Put the hand inside each sleeve or armhole and slide the hanger in. Button
any top button to prevent the garment from sliding off. Line up either the
tag on the shirt with the hanger hook or the shoulder seams with the hanger
arms.

B. Hanging Pants

Crease the pants the same way as when folding pants. Lay the pants flat on a
table with the pant legs out in front of you. Slide the hanger under the
pant legs, almost to the crotch, and raise up off of the table.

Laundry

A. Washing and Drying

Most washers and dryers have various types of settings. If possible, mark
the settings for regular and permanent press with glue dots, puffy paint, or
Hi Marks. Do not overload the washer or the dryer! Teach how to sort clothes
according to color and type of laundry and how to measure detergent.
Remember to put the detergent and bleach into the washer with the water
before putting the clothes into the washer (it is a good idea to swish the
water a few times to dissolve the detergent). To avoid ironing, take
polyester clothing out of the dryer before completely dry and hang up, or as
soon as the dryer stops, hang up the clothes quickly.

It is not recommended for blind students to use bleach in their laundry. If
bleach is to be used, then use it only on white cottons (make sure the
student knows about different fabrics). An alternative would be a detergent
with bleach safe for colors.

B. Stain Removal

Stains or spots on clothing must be found or identified by a sighted person.
The stain should be marked with a safety pin, or if the spot is large
surround the spot with safety pins. Use a prewash or stain treatment and let
it soak for a few minutes. Then wash the garment with the

other laundry in the washing machine.

+++++++++++++++

How to Get Rid of Ants

http://store.doyourownpestcontrol.com/crawling-insects/ant-control-products

I have included several resources for identifying types of ants, behaviors,
baits and differences
Differences Between Ants and Termites for readers to check out. There are
very helpful brief articles regarding each specific type of ant at each
link. Hope this helps someone in this ant season.

First identify the type of ant, then pick the correct product to remove the
infestation.

Household & Carpenter Ants:

Ant baits and
non-repellent
insecticide sprays are two popular methods for household ant control.

More information on ant baiting can be found here;


http://store.doyourownpestcontrol.com/crawling-insects/ant-control-products/
ant-baits

More information on non-repellent insecticide can be found here:

http://store.doyourownpestcontrol.com/crawling-insects/ant-control-products/
non-repellent-ant-spray

Baiting and insecticide spray can be combined for the most effective
treatment if a non-repellent spray is used.

Ant Baits: Ants require two types of food cycles to thrive. The cycles are
referred to as the sweet cycle and the grease/protein cycle. There’s no easy
way to tell which cycle an ant requires at any given moment. Using both
protein and sweet
baits

More information on
protein and sweet
baits can be found here;


http://store.doyourownpestcontrol.com/complete-ant-kit protein and sweet
baitsis the most effective method to bait ants.

Non-Repellent Insecticide Sprays:

http://store.doyourownpestcontrol.com/taurus-sc-insecticide

Sprays such as
Taurus SC (Fipronil 9.1%) are preferred for ant control. The ants
cannot detect its presence and crawl through the treated area. The
insecticide kills the ant slowly so it has plenty of time to track the
insecticide back to the nest.

Fire Ants:

Preventive Fire Ant Control: Preventive treatment with

Bifen LP granules is the easiest method to control fire ant populations.

Existing Fire Ant Infestation: If fire ants have already infested an area,
then a
fire ant bait is required
to get rid of the infestation.

more information on ordering and using

Bifen LP granules is found here: and

http://store.doyourownpestcontrol.com/bifen-lp-granules-granulars

A video explaining ant behavior. Kinds of ants and demonstration of how to
get rid of ants can be found at the link below.

Once arriving at the page mentioned below, locate the “play” link and hit
enter or click on that link.

http://www.doyourownpestcontrol.com/ants.htm

Resources regarding several types of ants found around homes are provided
below.

*Small Sized Ants
(Inside and Outside)

Argentine Ants

http://www.doyourownpestcontrol.com/arg.htm

Description:
Description: fire ant
Fire ants

http://www.doyourownpestcontrol.com/fire-ants.htm

Ghost Ants

http://www.doyourownpestcontrol.com/ghost.htm

Leafcutter ants

http://www.doyourownpestcontrol.com/leafcutter.htm

Description: Description:
odorous house ant
Odorous House Ants

http://www.doyourownpestcontrol.com/odorous.htm

Pavement Ants

http://www.doyourownpestcontrol.com/pavement_ants.htm

Pharaoh Ants

http://www.doyourownpestcontrol.com/phar.htm

*Large sized ants:
(Inside and Outside)

Carpenter Ants

http://www.doyourownpestcontrol.com/carp.htm

Fire Ants

10 Top Things to Know About Fire
Ants

http://doyourownpestcontrol.com/pest_control/questions_and_answers/top_10_th
ings_you_should_know_about_fire_ants.html

Ant Baiting Tips for Ants

http://www.doyourownpestcontrol.com/baiting.htm

Differences Between Ants and
Termites

http://www.doyourownpestcontrol.com/diff.htm

_________________________

From the pages of Donna’s travel diary

Thoughts of Kelowna

Ah yes! Kelowna! A beautiful city in British Columbia Canada and lying on
Okanagan Lake. A city with much warmth exuding from its residents.

Kelowna is a city on Okanagan Lake in the Okanagan Valley, in the southern
interior of British Columbia, Canada.
Kelowna is a recreational lakeside paradise with miles of beautiful parkland
and several sandy beaches. Amid summer sunshine, sparkling waters and warm
Okanagan smiles, the city of Kelowna is the Okanagan’s largest and liveliest
population centre.
The Okanagan Valley in British Columbia, Canada is beloved for the
unparalleled variety
of its climate and landscape. The Okanagan Valley has something for
everyone.

I traveled to Kelowna in May of 2012 to attend the annual general meeting of
the Alliance for Equality of Blind Canadians and at that time I was the
national president of this organization. I arrived on the Friday and left
on the Monday and celebrated my birthday there on the Saturday.

In comparison to other cities of British Columbia, Kelowna is small and
compact. The weather is supposed to be pleasant all year round but
sometimes Mother Nature throws in a few surprises and temperatures can
certainly dip below the zero mark. At the other end of the spectrum
temperatures can certainly wander into the above 30 mark and it is not
unusual to see this during the summer.

Kelowna has lots of parks and pleasant down town streets that are all very
accessible to the blind and partially sighted. Kelowna is the place where
the Alliance for Equality of Blind Canadians was born in 1992.

Kelowna could be your next vacation spot as it is certainly a place with
lots of possibilities.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan enjoying my travels.
On your next trip you could enrich your down time with some of my audio
mysteries. Take them with you wherever you go!
In the car, on the plane, on the bus or train, at the beach, anywhere!
Affordable, portable, (computer or i device) and you could either purchase
or Subscribe for unlimited access to my library at
www.donnajodhan.com/store.html
From the pages of Donna’s travel diary
Thoughts of Kelowna

Ah yes! Kelowna! A beautiful city in British Columbia Canada and lying on
the tip of British Columbia. A city with much warmth exuding from its
residents.

Kelowna is a city on Okanagan Lake in the Okanagan Valley, in the southern
interior of British Columbia, Canada.
Kelowna is a recreational lakeside paradise with miles of beautiful parkland
and several sandy beaches. Amid summer sunshine, sparkling waters and warm
Okanagan smiles, the city of Kelowna is the Okanagan’s largest and liveliest
population centre.
The Okanagan Valley in British Columbia, Canada is beloved for the
unparalleled variety
of its climate and landscape. The Okanagan Valley has something for
everyone.

I traveled to Kelowna in May of 2012 to attend the annual general meeting of
the Alliance for Equality of Blind Canadians and at that time I was the
national president of this organization. I arrived on the Friday and left
on the Monday and celebrated my birthday there on the Saturday.

In comparison to other cities of British Columbia, Kelowna is small and
compact. The weather is supposed to be pleasant all year round but
sometimes Mother Nature throws in a few surprises and temperatures can
certainly dip below the zero mark. At the other end of the spectrum
temperatures can certainly wander into the above 30 mark and it is not
unusual to see this during the summer.

Kelowna has lots of parks and pleasant down town streets that are all very
accessible to the blind and partially sighted. Kelowna is the place where
the Alliance for Equality of Blind Canadians was born in 1992.

Kelowna could be your next vacation spot as it is certainly a place with
lots of possibilities.

I’m Donna J. Jodhan enjoying my travels.

To learn more about me, visit
http://jodhanmysterybook.club/about-the-author/

On your next trip you could enrich your down time with some of my audio
mysteries. Take them with you wherever you go!
In the car, on the plane, on the bus or train, at the beach, anywhere!
Affordable, portable, (computer or i device) and you could either purchase
or Subscribe for unlimited access to my library at
www.donnajodhan.com/store.html
and you can now take advantage of our free downloads here.

Follow me on Twitter @accessibleworld and at author_jodhan
And like me on Facebook at
www.facebook.com/donnajodhan and at www.facebook.com/authordonnajodhan

Posted in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Helpful tips for July 2016

iphone battery life tips, speed boosting tricks for iphone 6s and more

Hello there! From time to time we at the business desk are pleased to bring you an article of interest and for this week we have a great one for you! We now invite you to read on! The Sterling Creations team +++++++++++++++ A Dan Thompson contribution iphone battery life tips, speed boosting tricks for iphone 6s and more | bgr 10 hidden iPhone tricks that will speed up your phone and extend your battery life By Zach Epstein Whether you have a brand new iPhone 6s or an older model from several years ago, there are two things we can pretty much guarantee are true: you wish your phone was faster and you wish your battery lasted longer. Battery life complaints go without saying since iPhone’s are among the worst performers in their class. As for speed, the new iPhone 6s is the fastest phone on the planet, but who can say no to an extra speed boost? And when it comes to older iPhone models, everything slows down over time. There are a number of different ways users try to speed up their phones and extend their battery life, and some things work better than others. In this post, however, we’re going to tell you about a few hidden tricks that might be just what the doctor ordered. MUST SEE: Here is a link to an article demonstrating How to hide Apple’s default apps bgr.com/2016/01/04/how-to-hide-apps-on-iphone-default-apps/ 1. Speed up your iPhone by clearing your RAM Screen Shot 2016-01-11 at 10.49.34 AM In just a few short seconds, you can easily clear out your phone’s RAM and help speed up performance. The longer you go without a reboot the more clogged your phone can get, but rebooting is a pain because it takes a while. With this trick, In just a few short seconds, you can easily clear out your phone’s RAM and help speed up performance. The longer you go without a reboot the more clogged your phone can get, but rebooting is a pain because it takes a while. With this trick, which was posted to Twitter a short while ago by iOS app developer Mark Forrest, you can clear your phone’s RAM in just a few seconds. Here’s all you need to do: a. Hold down your power button until you see "Slide to power off" at the top of the screen b. Then release the power button and hold down your home button for five seconds until the home screen reappears That’s it! Your iPhone will feel fresh and new without having to wait through a reboot. 2. Clear out cache in Apple apps iOS-7-App-Store-teaser-002 Cache buildups result in unnecessary clutter that can also slow down your iPhone, but there’s a great hidden trick Cache buildups result in unnecessary clutter that can also slow down your iPhone, but there’s a great hidden trick we posted about recently that almost no one knew about. There are several Apple apps that allow you to manually clear the cache. Examples include the App Store, Podcasts, Music, Game Center, iMessage and Phone. To clear out the cache in each app and help boost your phone’s speed, simply open any of the aforementioned apps and quickly tap 10 times in a row on one of the tab icons at the bottom of the screen. Once you do that, the screen will go blank for a moment and the cache will be cleared. 3. Automatically clear messages after 30 days cdn.bgr.com/2015/10/messages-delete-ios.png?w=624 You would be shocked at how much storage space your Messages app takes up. Don’t believe us? Visit Settings > General > Storage & iCloud Usage > Manage Storage and see for yourself. If you don’t clean things up, your Messages app can easily take up 5GB, 10GB, 15GB or even more space from all of the pictures and videos people send you over iMessage. Having all that old junk in there slows down your Messages app and your iPhone in general. Here’s how to fix it: go to Settings > Messages > Keep Messages and then change the setting from "Forever" to "30 Days" to clear up the most storage or "1 Year" if you’re not quite ready to lose all that history. Trust us, you’ll be glad you made this change. 4. Disable time-wasting animations iphone-6-plus-321 Apple’s transition animations in iOS look terrific as you switch apps and tap on icons to open new apps from a home screen, but believe it or not they also slow your phone down. Try this: go to Settings > General > Accessibility and enable the "Reduce Motion" option. You’ll > immediately see how much faster things happen on your phone. You can also toggle the "Increase Contrast" and "Reduce Transparency" options while you’re in there to give your battery life a slight boost. 5. Enable Wi-Fi Assist Wi-Fi Assist Moving on to battery life, there are a few things you can do to improve your iPhone’s battery performance and the first one is fairly controversial. Apple’s new Wi-Fi Assist feature switches from Wi-Fi to cellular data when your connection is spotty. This improves performance and saves battery life, but it also could cost you money if you have a small data plan or you’re roaming. To enable the feature, go to Settings > Cellular and slide the toggle next to "Wi-Fi Assist" to on. 6. Enable Low Power Mode maxresdefault Everyone has seen the little option pop up to enable Low Power Mode when their remaining charge gets down to 20% and then again at 10%, but you’d be surprised at how many people are unaware that this feature can be enabled at any time. So, if you’re going out for a long busy day away from Wi-Fi, enabling Low Power Mode can extend your battery life by several hours. Go to Settings > Battery > Low Power Mode and slide the toggle to on. This will disable push email, stop apps from refreshing in the background, and perform a few more tweaks that extend your iPhone’s battery life. 7. Adjust location settings iphone-6s-plus-vs-6s Some apps like Dark Sky and other weather apps have good reasons for constantly polling your location in the background. Others do precious little beyond invade your privacy and drain your battery. Go to Settings > Privacy > Location Services and you’ll see a list of all the apps that have access to your location. Anytime you see "Always" listed next to an app, think long and hard about whether or not that app should have access to your location when you’re not using it. If not, change the setting to "While using" or "Never." 8. Stop your iPhone from tracking you i0.wp.com/cdn.bgr.com/2015/04/iphone-location-tracking-ios-8.jpg Here’s another thing you might not know: by default, your iPhone is tracking your every move and saving a record of all of the places you visit in order to determine which spots you spend the most time at. We’ll pause for a moment to let that sink in. Just like the previous tip we gave you regarding location settings, there are several issues at play that relate to both privacy and battery longevity. If you’d like to tackle both at once, go to Settings > Privacy > Location Services, then scroll down until you see "Frequent > Locations," tap on it, and disable it. 9. Disable product improvement features iphone-6s It’s very kind of you if you want to help Apple improve its products, but you should know that you might be doing so at the expensive of your battery life (and potentially your privacy). In Settings > Privacy scroll to the bottom and tap on Diagnostics & Usage, then tap on "Don’t Send." Then, in Settings > Privacy > Location Services > System Services, scroll to the bottom and disable "Diagnostics & Usage," "Popular Near Me," "Routing & Traffic" and "Improve Maps." You can also disable anything else on that screen that you don’t feel should have access to your location. 10. Adjust Background App Refresh settings background-app-refresh-header Did you know that you’ll continue to get notifications even if you disable Background App Refresh for apps? Many people think the two are connected but they’re not, and background app refresh has a big impact on battery performance. Go to Settings > General > Background App Refresh and go through each and every app one at a time. If it doesn’t need to refresh in the background, disable it. Even email and messaging apps will keep working just fine with background app refresh disabled – they may take a fraction of a second longer to load when you open them, but your battery will thank you.

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